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66-96 Ford Broncos - Early & Full Size
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FLYFSHIN

The King Of Detailing

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BTW, to offer my expertise...I'm not a fantastic mechanic, or great spray artist...however, there is one topic that I know inside out. Detailing. Wax, cleaners, conditioners, polishing agents....if you have a question, I have an answer!

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your just the guy im lookin for. I want to remove all the old wax and polish my bronco up to nice new shine, so what do you reccomend. I wanna go all out, polish the chrome, aluminum wheels, tires, everything i can basically. Oh, what do you think would clean the top on broncos the best? ive tried a few things and none of them seem to work all that great on mine. if it helps, my bronco is white and the wheels are polished aluminum.

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I'm hoping the Flyfishing dude will have some good tips, too. Since I have a realtively new paint job, all that I use on it is a product from 3M called "Perfect-It Show car Liquid Wax, Ultra High Gloss Finish". Cost is about $18 for a bottle, but it's good for 5-6 applicqations on the Bronco. I use either very fine steel wool for all the chrome, or some Mother's polish. I also like the Mother's or Eagle ONe wheel cleaners, and the One-Touch tire cleaner. Invisible Glass for the windshield, and some CD-2 for the engine to shine it up. Mother's has a complete kit for detailing everything inside and out, including some compound or claybar to bring life back to old paint. I know a few folks like to use Woody's Wax on the hardtop.

 

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I have some kind of white scaly buildup on my windows..it is really hard to get off (a lot of elbow grease) got any tips?

 

I think I might try some of that show wax stuff, where did you get it?

 

Any ideas on how to get silicone off of paint?

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Kyle, I bought the 3M stuff at O'Reilley's Auto Parts there in Bay City. The number on the bottle is #39026. As for the glass, you may have some calcium deposits from the hard water there in town. Try the Invisible Glass, should work. If it don't come off, you can take a razor blade and some soap and water, and carefully scrape off the scale. Try a little WD-40 on the silicone to see if it will dissolve it or at least soften it up. The WD-40 works great for road tar removal, too. Let me know if there are any high school carwashes happening this Saturday. It's that time!!! B)

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Mansquirt...in reply to the wax/polish question...my responses are from my own experience, and some might be a matter of opinion.

 

1. I would start with a complete hand washing. Wash the car, working top to bottom. Use a quality soap, I personally use Mother's wash, and keep it very wet. Once you have the car soaped, rinse, again from top to bottom. Use a large towel towel, a regular shower variety works great, dry top to bottom. Make sure to keep folding the towel as you dry to keep dirt from sticking to the paint. Don't use absorber type cloths, as they trap contaminantes and you will just dirty your truck up again. It does not have to be perfectly dry at this point...all you wanted to do was pull off any lingering dirt that you didnt rinse off after the wash.

 

2. I would higly reccomend picking up a clay bar kit. Mother's makes a kit that you can pick up for about 15 bucks that has the bar, lubricant, and wax. Keep the area you are working in wet, rub the clay bar back and forth (NOT in circles) until the paint feels smooth as a baby's bottom. As with all body care products, work in small areas. Do this in a cooler area so the heat does not evaporate the lubricant...if the clay bar does not stay dripping wet, it will stick top your paint rather than slide across the surface. This process will pull up any enviromental contaminantes that are in the clear coat layer. If you have a single stage paint job, dont use a clay bar. Most fords 93 and up (and many before) have a two stage paint job, meaning you can safely work with a clay bar and additional polish products. Dont know if you have a two stage paint job? If you've waxed before, and the cloth does not turn the color of your truck, you have two stage paint. Generally a single stage paint oxidizes very quickly as well. If your truck has a whiteish haze to it, chances are it's single stage.

 

3. Next, get a clear coat polish (again, mother's is my favorite, but meguiars' makes a decent polish as well) and work in circles by hand with a clean soft cloth. This is the step that strips off most of the wax. Make sure that you use enough polish, because it serves as a lubricant too. Alot of pressure is less important than more action...rub more, press less. If you let the cloth go dry, you will be using the abrasives in the polish with no lubricants..you can leave some decent rub marks that way. Do no more than 2 ft sections at a time. Use a second cloth to wipe the area dry before it gets a chance to air dry.

 

4. After you've polished the whole truck, you can move on to waxing. I know alot of detailers that will work with a glaze first, and follow it up with a wax. The glaze is very shiny, however it is soft, which is some protect it with a harder coat of wax. Because we own trucks and not cars, I skip the glazing. After all, it's made to get dirty :) I use a good wax like eagle one, gold class, or mothers. Something to remember...if when it dries, it rubs off easily, the wax job will not last as long...enviro factors like sun, wind, rain, and dirt will quickly remove a "soft" wax job. Caranuba is my preferred wax, stay away from "polymer" based waxes, they simply dont give the desired shine. Stay out of the sun!!! This step is best performed in a well lighted garage, between 60-70 degrees. Again, work in small sections, overlap them, and work in a circular motion. Keep your applicator pad damp with wax...a tip on using the pad...dont put the wax directly on the truck, not ever. instead, put it on the pad, then squeeze the pad. It will suck up the wax, and make the application of the wax more uniform over the body. Get the pad well-hydrated with liquid wax. Use a soft cloth to buff the wax off. Again, a circular motion will leave less trail than a back and forth or up and down motion.

 

As for wheel polish...it really depends on the type of wheels you have. Polishing aluminum wheels is quite easy, you can pick up any polish off the shelf at walmart. they all work about the same. Something I've done in the past is to wax my wheels...I find that it helps the dirt come off easier next time you need to clean them. If you have powdercoated or painted wheels, the best way to clean them is with elbow grease, mild soap and a soft bristled brush. Tire dressing is also an important part of making your truck stand out. Dont use black magic or ANY spray on products..if they hit the paint, you'll need to start from square one, washing and waxing the affected area. Plus they spin off easier. Use a tire dressing in a gel form, and pick up some formed sponges to apply it wth. Make sure you wait at least an hour to drive the truck after applying it, so it does not end up on the side of the truck. Keep the dressing off the rims, it will attract dirt very fast.

 

Keep in mind, when polishing chromed body parts, NEVER use a harsh abrasive like the clearcoat polish. It will take the shine off, and the only way to get it back is to re-chrome or replace it. Pick up a quality chrome polish, and follow the instructions. Each brand is different, but generally the maker will know best how to use it. If you have fiberglass painted bumper covers, treat them as you would any body part, wash, claybar, polish, then wax.

 

STAY AWAY FROM CONTACT CAR WASHES when you dont have time to do it yourself. The cloth that most car washes use tends to hang onto dirt...you will end up with car covered in scratches. Use touchless car washes if in need of a quick clean. Oftentimes after I get done with the waxing phase, I will take my truck through a touchless wash with a blow dryer, then resume the detailing steps. This removes all of the white residue from waxing without removing the wax itself.

 

The top on the bronco, I've found, is a matter of much debate. It's a fiberglass top, but textured. I would recommend using the same soap you used for the body, along with a soft bristled brush to get in the texture marks. I'm hesitant to suggest my favorite option for cleaning stubborn body dirt, because I'm not entirely certian how it would affect the gelcoat. Take one gallon of hot water, .5 cups of liquid dove dish soap, and .25 cups of ammonia. This mixture is also an AWESOME glass cleaner. It might be a little too costic for your top though, I would try a brush and soap before trying anything else.

 

If you follow the 4 step detailing process, I promise, your truck will look better than you ever thought it would. I use this on my show cars, and I firmly believe they are the reason that my cars stand out. People are constantly complimenting me on my daily drivers, even strangers in the supermarket parking lot. Do steps 2 and 3 only once a year in the spring, otherwise you will remove too much clearcoat. Washing and waxing your vehical regularly will improve it's appearance, and make the paint and body last longer.

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Another trick/tip...if you have road tar or sap on your car, pick up a container of Crisco...forget those fancy removers in the store. Park your car outside on a hot day, let the paint warm up, then put a dab of crisco on it. Let it set for at least an hour, then go out and remove the tar using a cloth..you might need to repeat this a few times. The secret is that the crisco softens and suspends the sap. Normally, when it gets soft, you cant remove it because you'll smear it. When you have crisco on the car, the sap can't stick to it, so instead it sticks to the cloth. I've used my fingernail a few times to remove stubborn spots, but be careful not to get into the clearcoat.

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Question: i have greasy finger prints all over my bronco, from working in it in the shop. me and all my buddies touched it with greasy fingers! I tried getting them off with soap and water, but it doesnt work so well. Any suggestions? Also there is over spray on my rear window, its white spray paint (someone wasnt too careful). how do i get that off? thanks!

~sarah

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Sarah,

Depending on the type of grease, it may be very difficult to get off your truck. I would first reccomend trying straight dawn, right on the paint.let it sit for a min or two, then with a damp cloth, wipe it off. The grease should come right up. Lithium grease tends to stick harder...it might be a good idea to stop by the local parts store (if the dawn does not work) and pick up a small container of PPG de-greaser. You'r going to need a solvent, but you dont want to go as drastic as thinner or anything on that order, or you can trash your CC/BC (clearcoat/basecoat).

 

WD-40 is a great solvent as well, i've used it a few times and never had any problems with my paint. Let me know which product works best for you!

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Due to the lack of dawn in my home i used Joy, ,which seemed to work quite well! thanks for the suggestion!

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I just bought a replacement spare cover and it was in quite dirty shape. I got most of the mud and dirt off of it. But now what is left is like some kind of build-up. They are some circular mold looking spots, that wont scrub off. Know of anything that can get it off of that kind of material? :blink:

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Kyle, I have used Formula 409, Simple Green, and plain Chlorox bleach to remove the surface mold we get down here, but be real careful with the Chlorox. Try the Simple Green first, it's safe for everything but old paint. I sprayed some on the inner fenders on my Bronco, and it removed the paint. I have a magnetic sign on my Z-71, and the S.G. cleaned it up like new!!!

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Due to the lack of dawn in my home i  used Joy.

dawn is incredible at cutting grease.

 

they should sell this stuff at the parts store :D

 

a trick i dont do now but did with my old truck (bear with me, its related to dawn)-

 

i love wheeling .. no matter if i have a show truck (had a sweet 74 years ago) or a woods beater (what i have now). with my old show truck i has an impossible time cleaning the frame.. but once i got it finally clean, i kept it clean by applying PAM cooking spray to the underside before i'd go off wheeling ... when i came back and started to clean the truck, the pan kept the mud from sticking to the frame and dawn was great at cutting the PAM off the truck :D

 

ive heard oven cleaner works very well for cleaning frames... but i did not use this to clean mine.

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:P That is a first, never heard of putting pam under your truck...but creative I guess

or how about chewing tobacco on chrome ?

 

chome thats out in the elements (salt/mud/water) for long periods of time will be protected by the tobacco juice. its great for the long winter months when its too cold to clean. when spring comes just clean .. works great.

 

 

 

heh ... ive never heard of using pam either ... i tried it and it worked pretty well. i should add not to put pam on your exhaust :)

 

ive not found a way to keep exhaust clean.

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I have also heard of the PAM on the underside to keep mud from sticking, and know some folks that apply Vaseline to chrome to protect it. Just don't put that on your paint! I have used the Dow Scrubbing Bubble bathroom cleaner (lemon fresh scent) to clean my engine and as a degreaser. It works very well!!!

 

All of these "telephone bugs" or "luv bugs" we have flying around here in South Texas now are making a mess!!! I found the best thing to safely remove them from paint, like on the front of the hood, is Orange Hand Cleaner or GoJo. It cuts grease and bugs. For the glass, I use an ammonia-based window cleaner a few times a day. The stuff from Gunk is about the cheapest. The bugs are very greasy, and my windshield gets splattered so bad I can't see. You cannot read my front license plate, it's solid bugs. I cannot drive my Bronco with the Shaker cause they fill up the intake scoop and clog the filter. :((

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Those love bugs are crazyyy!! They are everywhere! Thanks for the tip to get them off.

 

For my b-day I got enough money to buy a bug deflector and 2 stainless KC's

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All of these "telephone bugs" or "luv bugs" we have flying around here in South Texas now are making a mess!!! I found the best thing to safely remove them from paint, like on the front of the hood, is Orange Hand Cleaner or GoJo. It cuts grease and bugs. For the glass, I use an ammonia-based window cleaner a few times a day. The stuff from Gunk is about the cheapest. The bugs are very greasy, and my windshield gets splattered so bad I can't see. You cannot read my front license plate, it's solid bugs. I cannot drive my Bronco with the Shaker cause they fill up the intake scoop and clog the filter. :((

damn !!!!

 

and i thought they were bad in Florida :blink:

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Go to the carwash twice a day and blast them off!!! The bugshield will get plastered up like the rest of the front, and the radiator will get plugged up. I wash my windshield at lunchtime, and by 2:00PM I can't see again. They're also on the inside of the cab, and the spider webs are fillin' up!!! I'll have to take a pic tomorrow of how bad it is around here, for you folks outside of Matagroda County, Texas!!!

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Guest Stephen Hawk

I've been lucky enough not to be in state durring that time of year for the last several years but I do remember the kind of havoc they used to do to my cooling system and a/c condenser when I lived in the sticks in Fort bend county. One thing I used to do that works pretty well to keep them out of the radiator is to zip tie a window screen behind the grille and just clean it once or twice a week; then when the bastards all die off in a month or 2 I just put the screen back on the house.

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