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66-96 Ford Broncos - Early & Full Size
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Guest jackson

pantannojack

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Guest jackson

My 96 Bronco I have owned and driven since two years old developed rear axle leak.  I took it to my local country mech so I could bicycle home.  He had it two days to replace seals and I got it back, drove a week, 2-3 hundred miles, checked the read fluid level because it whines now.  It took 36 oz of gear oil.  How mad should I be?

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Yo Jackson,

I feel your rage.   A defunct local Ford dealer manager sent our bought new 96  Bronco in 1998 to their Dodge dealership for brake rotor deterioration at only 28k miles.   The Dodge crew really screwed up the Bronco.  Worse was tgat the idiot manager called my much-better-half and told her to pick uo tge Bronco at tge Dodge dealership a mile away from the Ford A-HAT's dealership.

When my wife got into it and drove straight out of the lot (hmm, conventionally parked at an exit onto a 55 mph highway) and  "braked" due to traffic, the steering wheel snapped Hard Right and Bronco rolled to a stop against a light pole.

Umm, no brakes, no Manager at Ford dealership because he hot a call from the Dodge crew and left.

After confronting the manager calmly next day, tge entire brake hardwzre was replaced courtesy if the dealerships Owner with an apology to us.

Go to him and tell him what occurred. Try to be calm, but firm.

Here is some whine info other than low fluid level from 1996 Bronco Workshop Manual, partial @  http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/manual/stj/stjleft.htm

Ford advises;

"A gear-driven unit (especially on a drive axle) will produce a certain amount of noise. Some noise is acceptable and may be audible at certain speeds or under various driving conditions, as on a newly paved blacktop road. The slight noise is in no way detrimental to operation of the rear axle and must be considered normal.

Vehicles equipped with a limited slip (Traction-Lok®) differential may exhibit a slight stick-slip noise (chatter) on tight turns after extended highway driving. This is considered acceptable and has no detrimental effect.

Bearing Whine

Bearing whine is a high-pitched sound similar to a whistle. It is usually caused by malfunctioning pinion bearings, which are operating at driveshaft speed. Bearing noise occurs at all driving speeds. This distinguishes it from gear whine which usually comes and goes as speed changes. 

Chatter While Turning

Chatter while turning is a condition in which the rear end vibrates. The vibration is plainly felt and may be heard as a groaning noise. In conventional axles, extra differential thrust washers cause a condition of partial lockup that creates this chatter. Chatter noise on Traction-Lok® axles can usually be traced to erratic movement between adjacent clutch plates and can be corrected with a lubricant change that includes friction modifier additive. 

Click at Engagement

Click at engagement is a slight noise condition, distinct from a clunk, that occurs in reverse or drive engagement. It can be corrected by installing a rear axle drive pinion shaft oil slinger (4670) between the rear axle universal joint flange and outer differential pinion bearing (4621). 

Axle Shaft Noise

Axle shaft noise is similar to gear noise and differential pinion bearing whine. Axle shaft bearing noise will normally distinguish itself from gear noise by occurring in all driving modes (drive, coast and float), and will persist with transmission in neutral while vehicle is moving at problem speed. If the vehicle makes this noise, remove suspect axle shafts, replace rear wheel bearings and install a new set of wheel seals. Re-evaluate vehicle for noise before removing any internal components."

GL!

Al

 

 

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Guest Pantannojack

Thanks Miesk5, for the informative advise.  A good thing he was closed Friday when I discovered the gear box was only half refilled.  I was wrong about how much I added;  It was more like 44 ounces, a quart and a half in a three quart axle housing.

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Yo,

YW!

BTW, "Lubricant levels are determined by filling the axle 6.4-14.2mm (1/4 to 9/16 inch) below the bottom of the filler hole with vehicle in a level position."

BTW #2, is the 8.8 a Traction-Lok Limited Slip?

if so, "Use Premium Rear Axle Lubricant XY-80W90-QL or -KL or equivalent meeting Ford specification WSP-M2C197-A, plus 118 ml (4 ounces) of Ford Friction Modifier F3TZ-19B546-MA or equivalent meeting Ford specification WSP-M2C196-A for Traction-Lok® limited slip rear axles.

Note: Synthetic lubricants have no equivalents. Use no other lubricant." by Ford

 

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