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Tips on Top End Reassembly

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I took off the top end to change the head gaskets. I am about to reassemble. I figured I would ask about any pitfalls to avoid from you fine folks that have done this before.

 

Much thanks in advance.

 

'93 Eddie Bauer

5.0, 302

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Make sure everything is clean.

Hopefully the pushrods were marked when you took them out, so they go back to the same lifter and rocker.

Clean the threads on the bolts, and use thread compound, to allow them to turn and not gall.

( some head bolts are not reuseable, and you need to get new ones. Once they are torqued they are streached and do not compress. I don't know if your engine is that type.)

Get the proper torque specs, and sequence, and torque in graduated steps.

Work smart and check yourself, and everything should go back together smooth.

 

Good luck

 

P.S.: Love the Conan quote!

Edited by Rons beast

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Thanks for the input. I labeled the pushrods, so they should be fine. (I do need to clean them, though.) I do have questions about the gaskets. On which ones should I apply sealant? The machine shop told me to skip the sealant on the head gaskets. But, what about the gaskets on the manifolds? I have no idea.

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yo,

 

5.0 & 5.8 Disassembly & Assembly Procedures, Adjustments, Specifications & Special Service Tools & Equipment

by Mitchell http://vintage.mitchell1.com/PClubData/chassis/den81/V2D816075.pdf

 

Coolant & Vacuum Leaks, 5.0L, 5.0L HO & 5.8L; "...Intake manifold coolant and vacuum leaks have been found to be quite common on Ford 5.0L, 5.0L HO (High Output) and 5.8L engines. For this engine, following the proper intake manifold torque values and torque sequence is very critical. Installation of the aluminum intake manifold should proceed as follows: Clean all gasket surfaces of debris and oil residue. Apply a 1/8 bead of silicone sealer in the 4 corners where the cylinder heads meet the cylinder block (Figure 1). Install the intake manifold side and end gaskets and apply a 1/16 bead of silicone sealer in the 4 joints formed by the gaskets. Mount the manifold and torque the bolts in sequence to 15-20 lbs.ft (Figure 2). Torque the bolts in sequence to 23-25 lbs.ft. After the engine has reached operating temperature, retorque the intake manifold bolts to 23-25 lbs.ft..."

Source: by automotix.net http://www.automotix.net/autorepair/ford-e_150_econoline-engine_repair_guide-1071.html

 

Availability of New Silicone Gasket & Sealant TSB 98-7-4 for 84-96 Bronco; 84-98 Econoline, F-150, F-250 HD, F-250 LD; 84-99 Super Duty F Series, etc.

A new Silicone Gasket And Sealant (F7AZ-19554-EA) material is now available for routine engine service or repair of engine oil leaks.

ACTION Use the new Silicone Gasket And Sealant for servicing:

 

Oil pan gaskets and T-joints

Intake end seals

Overhead cam caps

Valve and timing covers

Bearing split lines

Side cover plates

Rear oil seals

The new sealant has better adhesion, flexibility for moving/vibrating joints, resistance to fluids, and is easier to dispense.

NOTE: THIS MATERIAL IS NOT A DIRECT REPLACEMENT FOR A SILICONE RUBBER, GRAPHITE, OR OTHER TYPE OF PRE-FORMED GASKET.

==========

 

 

 

 

some of this helps too, plus for posterity;

Engines - Gasket Surface Cleaning Procedures Article No. 93-23-14

PUBLICATION DATE: November 10, 1993

FORD

1988-93 Crown Victoria, Escort, Festiva, Mustang, Taurus, Tempo, Thunderbird

1989-93 Probe

LINCOLN-MERCURY

1988-89 Tracer

1988-92 Mark VIII

1988-93 Cougar, Grand Marquis, Sable, Topaz, Town Car

1991-93 Capri, Tracer

1993 Mark VIII

MERKUR

1988-89 Scorpio, XR4TI

LIGHT TRUCK

1988-90 Bronco II

1988-93 Aerostar, Bronco, Econoline, F Super Duty, F-150-350 Series, Ranger

1991-93 Explorer

1993 Villager

 

ISSUE Some engine assemblies replaced under warranty have been found to be internally contaminated. This condition may be traceable to a previous repair involving removal of the valve cover(s), intake manifold and cylinder head(s). Scuffed pistons/bores, excessively worn crankshaft/camshaft bearings, low or no oil pressure, engine knocking and excessive oil consumption can result from improper engine gasket surface preparation.

ACTION Refer to the following TSB article for gasket sealing surface preparation procedures recommended by Ford Motor Company.

 

 

Service Procedure

Identify the composition of the component part before proceeding with a cleaning operation. Determine whether the part is cast iron, steel, aluminum or plastic. This can usually be distinguished by the inherent hardness and/or weight of the part.

If the part is iron or steel, use a scraper with a high carbon blade, for best results. The key is to use a high carbon steel blade that is "razor-sharp." With a sharp blade, very little effort is required to peel off the old gasket.

Lay the blade flat on the surface and push slowly and evenly. Don't allow the blade corners to tip in and mar the surface.

Rounding off the blade corners with a small grinder will prevent scratching and gouging of the gasket surface.

WARNING:

USE EXTREME CARE TO KEEP HANDS AND FINGERS CLEAR OF THE BLADE.

 

If the part is aluminum or plastic, a different scraper must be used. Carbon steel or any other steel edge will cut, mar, gouge or burr aluminum and plastic. A teflon or hard wooden scraper is recommended. First use a commercially-available spray solvent, allowing ample time for the solvent to act on the gasket. A suitable solvent should evaporate and leave no residue behind. Otherwise, the residue can cause a new leak to form.

NOTE:

UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES ARE ANY GASKET SURFACES TO BE CLEANED AND PREPARED FOR SEALING BY USING A HAND GRINDER, ROTARY WIRE BRUSH, SANDING DISC OR PAD OR ANY OTHER POWER TOOL USING AN ABRASIVE SURFACE AS A CUTTING TOOL. THESE TOOLS HAVE BEEN FOUND TO PROMOTE ENTRY OF SANDING GRIT AND GASKET MATERIAL INTO ENGINE CAVITIES. THESE TOOLS CAN DAMAGE THE SURFACE FINISH AND POSSIBLY DISTORT THE ORIGINAL FLATNESS OF THE COMPONENT, LEADING TO FURTHER VACUUM, COMPRESSION AND/OR FLUID LEAKS.

 

To prevent gasket material or other foreign matter from entering internal engine compartments, place CLEAN shop towels over exposed cavities. Use extreme care when removing the towels; remove them SLOWLY. Cloth towels can drop as much foreign material into the engine as they originally collected during cleaning operations.

Another alternative is to use a portable shop vacuum. Moving a vacuum nozzle closely along with the scraper edge will help direct loosened gasket particles into the vacuum and away from the engine.

The same care used in preparing the gasket surface should be practiced when assembling component parts such as the intake manifold and cylinder heads. Both are critical leak areas requiring extra care during assembly. Some things to consider are:

Not all engines use the same sealants in the same places. Some parts use no sealant at all.

Consult the service manual first. Don't assume that a gasket needs sealant. Some gaskets are designed with a pre-cast bead. Adding sealant to this design type will create a leak by shimming the two mating surfaces.

Although some aftermarket gaskets look the same as the ones removed, use only Ford original equipment parts to ensure that the customer receives consistent quality and value.

Avoid gasket locating products such as "tack'ems". These chemicals may leave residues in the engine that are incompatible with the oil, and may even cause damage to the catalytic converter.

Practice CLEANLINESS when reinstalling components and gaskets.

A small leak path can become a larger one as fluid erodes a gasket.

Keep dirt, lint and unwanted chemicals off new gaskets.

DO NOT assume that once dirt enters the engine that the oil filter will cleanse the oil to its original state and protect the engine from harmful abrasives. Particles such as silica (sand) are small enough to pass through even the best oil filters. The grinding effect of sand and dirt in oil on internal bearing or wear surfaces is comparable to the effect of valve compound for lapping-in valves.

Torque sequence of components such as intake manifold and cylinder heads is extremely critical for proper sealing.

Not only does sequencing make a more effective seal, it also protects the part from warpage or distortions caused by improper tightening. Aluminum is particularly susceptible to warpage from uneven tightening of fasteners.

In some instances, fasteners used on aluminum components must be loosened in sequence. Consult the service Manual in EVERY instance for correct torque and/or de-torque values and sequences.

After a repair job, it is a good practice to use a black light leak test to confirm that the repair was successful. For example, it would be easy to assume that the rear main crankshaft seal was leaking when in fact the intake manifold gasket allowed oil to run down the back of the engine. Consider all the facts which allow fluid to travel outside the engine (fan air blast, road air blast, gravity, or escaping/pressurized fluid spray.

To sum-up, a successful leak repair depends on:

 

Accurate diagnosis of the leak using Ford-recommended test equipment and procedures.

Surface preparation and gasket installation using the proper cleaning tools

Exercising care and cleanliness during assembly/disassembly of components

Use of genuine Ford OEM parts.

 

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Miesk5 has the most recent info.

My old school rule of thumb is: If the gasket is metal or has metal in it, don't use any sealer ( exception is the corners of the manifold to head mating surfaces, and things similar.

 

Good Luck

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yo,

Torque Specs By Chilton via my local library access;

 

VALIDATE ALL by using other ref sources such as;

Repair Guides & Wiring Diagrams (click vehicle, year range) & go to Chassis Electrical & scroll for Wiring Diagrams...(under license from Delmar Publishers, comb of Chilton/Nichols/Delmar & Haynes); some may be incorrect, as reported by Seabronc, thanks Seabronc! NEW SITE URL!!! MUST REGISTER TO VIEW; select year, make, model, engine size and go to appropriate section

Source: by Chilton via Autozone http://www.autozone.com

 

check Library; mine also has All Data on-line for free but in-library use only; All Data uses the Ford docs

 

Auto Repair Reference Center Repair Manual, Mostly Chilton; many local library's offer free online access for their members; just log-in w/your library Card # and password; incl. all Broncos, & many MAKES! 1951 to current; some years (85-Current, I believe) include: FULL Technical Service Bulletins and Recalls, Labor Hours per repair (plug in appl info); some Wiring Diagrams, Vacuum Diagrams (in DRIVEABILITY AND EMISSIONS CONTROLS Section), Specifications (torques, etc.) & Maintenance Intervals

Source: by arrc at http://search.ebscohost.com/

 

and for other info;

Ford Fuel Injection and Electronic Engine Control: How to Understand, Service and Modify, 1988-1993; Scroll Down on First Page, Click on each Section, then on next page, click on the pdf file; the complete book is over 85MB pdf and can be downloaded @ http://www.yunost.ru/docs/Ford-injectors-book/Book.pdf

Source: by Charles O. Probst via yunost.ru

 

 

Torque Specifications 87-96 part 1

http://content.chiltonsonline.com/content/images/8492/images/84923233.pdf

AC Compressor, Alternator, Bell Housing, Camshaft, Connecting Rods

 

Torque Specifications 87-96 part 2

http://content.chiltonsonline.com/content/images/8492/images/84923234.pdf

Crankshaft Damper, Crankshaft Pulley to Damper, Cylinder Head, Distributor Hold-Down Bolt, Fan & Clutch, Engine Mount Nuts, Diesel Engine to Cross-Member Nuts

 

 

Torque Specifications 87-96 part 3

http://content.chiltonsonline.com/content/images/8492/images/84923235.pdf

Intake Manifold to Cylider Head (see steps), Exhaust Manifold, Exhaust Pipe to Exhaust Manifold, Front Cover, Flywheel to Crankshaft, Pump to Block (4.9), Upper Intake to Lower Intake Manifold, Main Bearing Cap Bolts (5.0 & 5.8 is 12-18 ft lbs.)

 

Torque Specifications 87-96 part 4

http://content.chiltonsonline.com/content/images/8492/images/84923236.pdf

Exhaust System (Inlet Pipe to Manifold, Hanger Bracket and Insulator to Frame, etc.), Oil Cooler to Block, Oil Pan to Block, Oil Pan Drain Plug, Rocker Arm Bolts, Rocker Arm Stud to Head, Rocker Covers, Side cover (6.9)

 

 

Torque Specifications 87-96 part 5

http://content.chiltonsonline.com/content/images/8492/images/84923237.pdf

Spark Plugs, Starter Mounting Bolts, Thermostat Housing, Torque Converter to Flywheel, TC Inspection Plate Bolts, Water Pump Bolts, Vacuum Pump (Diesels)

 

Torque Specifications 87-96 part 6 for 7/3 Di Turbo Diesel

http://content.chiltonsonline.com/content/images/8828/images/88283c41.pdf

AC compr, eng mount nuts, etc.

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