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You have to pull the throttle body to get to them.

Thank you, I thought i would have to!

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Thank you, I thought i would have to!

To my new friends/teachers the wise ones! The bronco idles and run great! From learning how to pull my codes to the heads up on those screws, I say thank you!!! Defiant

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broncojoe19,

in doing the KOER test on my 92 Ranger the system did not respond in the manner you have written....it gave one very brief flash more like a flicker then started flashing a 998 code followed by a 224 code! Is the PCM programed to do this when there is a 998 code in the KOER test, just bypass the other flashes or steps and just dump out the 998 code? Thanks.

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post-19191-0-30619200-1354459992_thumb.jpgpost-19191-0-30619200-1354459992_thumb.jpg |-)/> Well I ran the KOEO self test on my 1993 Bronco and was slightly confused the first time around, and I'm not sure that I was any more confident the second or third time.Second and third attempt did produce the exact same codes.I was confused about one thing, I read that after starting engine, if you get one flash,you are to rapidly but briefly depress accelerator wide open.Then it should flash "Engine Id" code,( my 8 cyl should flash 4 times). After EI code I am to depress brake pedal, turn wheel 1/2 turn and push OD button twice.But then it sais after 6-20 sec pause,I may see single flash and I should punch accelerator,then after 4-15 sec pause it should start displaying codes.I did get single flash after starting engine so I punched throttle, I then got 1 flash,pause,then 4 flashes,short pause then1 quick flash,short pause 7 flashes,2 flashes then short pause with 1 quick flash,again 7-2. I didn't receive any more flashes after that.Should I not have accelerated after the initial 1 flash immediately after starting engine? My KOEO test came out even more confusing,seems like flashes were faster and more of them.Any help you can give me would be appreciated so much. Edited by Medic2DaResq

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Hope this is the right area to post this question...

 

I would like to get a Reader for my 1989 Full-size but don't know what to get. What should I be looking at buying? I would like to get a Reader w/ Display (if I wanted to look at lights I'd do it the hard way.) My budget is $0-$75.

 

I've seen the Equus 3145 but I want to know if their are other options out their.

Edited by Skitter302

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yo Medic2DaResq,

 

Sorry for the delay in replying, I had to get some body work done (not on the Bronco, my bod..lol)

 

Fast DTCs are issued before slow service DTCs. These DTCs contain the identical information as the slow DTCs, but are transmitted at 100 times the normal rate. These DTCs are interpreted by special equipment at the end of the assembly line by the Body and Assembly Division, as well as the SUPER STAR II tester. After Fast DTCs have been output, Self-Test should not be exited (remove jumper, unlatch button, etc.) until all the Slow DTCs have been output. Exiting before slow DTCs have been output will erase any Continuous Memory DTCs.

 

Some meters in service detect these codes as a short burst of information (slight meter deflection).

 

Ryan M also addresses this in his self test @

http://oldfuelinjection.com/?p=13

 

When the “Check Engine” light blinks during the test you will get several different blinks, the separation time between blinks is used to indicate what information is being displayed.

 

Turn key to RUN.

You will hear some relays engage and the fuel pumps prime the system. This is the EEC beginning the test.

The fuel pumps will stop and the EEC will now begin giving codes.

You may catch a brief flickering of the light. This is a rapid code read that is used by the code readers you can purchase. Do not worry all those rapid flashes you just say flicker buy will now be given at a slower pace of �, 2, & 4 second pauses.

First digit of first KOEO code (1/2 second between blinks)

2 second pause

Second digit of first KOEO code (1/2 second between blinks)

4 second pause

Next KOEO code

Once all KOEO codes are read the EEC will repeat them

6 second pause

Single Separator Blink (this indicates the change from KOEO codes to CM codes)

6 second pause

Codes from Continues Memory (uses same 1/2, 2, and 4 second timing as KOEO codes and also repeats them)

If nothing has been recorded by the EEC since last battery disconnect you will see:

 

Blink – 2 sec – blink – 4 sec – blink – 2 sec – blink – 6 sec – blink – 6 sec – blink – 2 sec – blink – 4 sec – blink – 2 sec � blink

 

This translates into 11-11 current condition (KOEO) and 11-11 in the continues memory (CM); or SYSTEMPASS

 

This may seem hard to count; recommendation is to record codes with slashes, and to lump them all together. Sort them out into numerical codes later. Here is an example of this

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yo SKIITER,

the Equus 3145 is good.

Actron CP9015 is =

Post Coses found here by

KOEO

and

KOER

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hi every one i need some help i have a 1995 bronco 5.0 i have tryed reading my codes but no light came on dash took it apart and found that the bulb burnt out. replaced the bulb light works but when i by pass it like all the instructions say nothing happins i could use some help please..email [email protected]

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hi every one i need some help i have a 1995 bronco 5.0 i have tryed reading my codes but no light came on dash took it apart and found that the bulb burnt out. replaced the bulb light works but when i by pass it like all the instructions say nothing happins i could use some help please..email [email protected]

 

 

yo,

I replied to your PM - here it is;

yo,

OK, take a look at this by RYAN M

 

 

http://oldfuelinjection.com/index.php?p=44

 

 

EEC IV Connector Pin Depiction Pic by Ryan M (Fireguy50)

http://oldfuelinjection.com/?p=3

 

PIN LEGEND http://oldfuelinjection.com/truckpinouts.html

Select MASS AIR or Speed Density in

 

and his Test for Codes in case you used a different source that skipped a step(S)

http://oldfuelinjection.com/index.php?p=13

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yo,

I replied to your PM - here it is;

yo,

OK, take a look at this by RYAN M

 

 

http://oldfuelinjection.com/index.php?p=44

 

 

EEC IV Connector Pin Depiction Pic by Ryan M (Fireguy50)

http://oldfuelinjection.com/?p=3

 

PIN LEGEND http://oldfuelinjection.com/truckpinouts.html

Select MASS AIR or Speed Density in

 

and his Test for Codes in case you used a different source that skipped a step(S)

http://oldfuelinjection.com/index.php?p=13

 

 

 

 

ok i was finally able to get my codes not sure what to make of it all need your help this is what i got

 

1 2 1 1 2 1 1 -these code repeat> 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 2 5 1 7 2 2 1 1 2 1 2 3 3 2

.| /|| / | / | / || / | / | / | / || / | / | / || / || / | / || / ||||| / | / ||||||| / || / || / | / | / || / | / || / ||| / ||| / || /

my check engine light is on and truck bucks like a bronco when it shifts i have an automatic 5.9l

 

 

help

please

Edited by suckered in too it

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yo,

My vision is off a bit due to meds; let me guess @ Codes..or find a store that will read codes for free.

Both Eng off and end running @ norm op temp

DTC 121, 122, 123, 124, 125 & DTC P0122, P0123 & P1121 in TSB 94-26-4; "...The following is a list of vehicle symptoms which have been associated with the TPS, but can also be related to other vehicle components. Check engine light, Stalls, quits, hesitation/stumble, fast idle; To minimize the replacement of good components, be advised that the following non-EEC areas may be the issue: Excessive blow-by, PCV malfunction, Vacuum leaks, Fuel pressure, Throttle sticking or linkage binding. MANY VOLTMETERS WILL AUTOMATICALLY CHANGE RANGES WHEN MEASURING TPS OUTPUT FROM IDLE TO WOT. WHEN A VOLTMETER IS USED TO MEASURE TPS OUTPUT FROM IDLE TO WOT, THE METER SCALES OR CHANGES RANGES AUTOMATICALLY. THERE MAY BE AN ERRONEOUS METER DISPLAY UNTIL THE VOLTMETER HAS LOCKED TO THE APPROPRIATE VOLTAGE READING. THE ERRONEOUS METER DISPLAY DOES NOT REPRESENT A DEFECTIVE TPS. NOTE: IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT THE "RANGE LOCK" FEATURE ON MANY METERS BE SET FOR CHECKING TPS VOLTAGE

 

DTC 122 through 125 Troubleshooting & Possible Causes; "...The TPS is located at the end of the throttle shaft on the throttle body. Using the TPS voltage signal the EEC determines fuel delivery based on throttle position. A bad TPS can be the cause of bad idle, which is caused by the injector pulse fluctuating. Some loss in performance can also be expected..."

Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) Function & Diagnosis TSB 94-26-4 by Ford for 93-95

ISSUE: The following Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) TSB has been developed for service use. This TSB includes the following topics:

Description And Background Of TPS

(A1) and (A2) - Diagnostic Trouble Codes (Service Tips)

(B) - Troubleshooting The TPS

© - TPS Application Charts

ACTION: If TPS diagnosis or repair is required, refer to the following procedures for service details.

DESCRIPTION The Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) is a rotary potentiometer that provides a voltage signal to the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) that is linearly proportional to the throttle plate/shaft angular position. The TP sensor has a three-blade electrical connector that is plated. The plating increases the corrosion resistance on terminals and increases the connector durability. The TP sensor is mounted on the throttle body and is non-adjustable. As the TP sensor is rotated by the throttle shaft, four (4) operating conditions are determined by the PCM from the TP sensor.

The four (4) vehicle operating conditions are:

Closed throttle (idle or deceleration)

Part throttle (cruise, moderate acceleration)

Wide open throttle (maximum acceleration, de-choke on crank and A/C shut-off)

Throttle angle rate.

BACKGROUND: Recently, revisions have been made to the TPS, which have improved reliability and durability.

(A1) - DIAGNOSTIC TROUBLE CODES (DTC)

A key difference between EEC-IV, OBD I and EEC-V, OBD II is the monitors. EEC-IV monitors are designed to identify system and component issues. EEC-V monitors are designed to measure the ability of systems and components to maintain low emission levels.

To minimize the replacement of good components, be advised that the following non-EEC areas may be the issue:

Excessive blow-by

PCV malfunction

Vacuum leaks

Fuel pressure

Throttle sticking or linkage binding.

(A2) - EEC-IV DIAGNOSTIC TROUBLE CODES (DTC)

When a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) 121, 124 or 125 are set in continuous memory, the technician is directed to Pinpoint Test G of the Powertrain Control/Emissions Diagnosis (PC/ED) Manual. Pinpoint Test G is named: In-Range MAF/TP/Fuel Injector Pulse Width Test. The description of the test is as follows:

EEC-IV DTC Code 121, 124, and 125 Description.

This In-Range Self-Test was designed to identify in-range concerns of the MAF sensor, TP sensor, or the fuel delivery system. The PCM will use information from these three (3) areas based on vehicle load to generate three (3) independent values. The three (3) independent values will be continuously monitored by the PCM. If one (1) of the values differs significantly from the others during normal vehicle operation, a Continuous Memory Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) will be stored.

EEC codes for the TPS are intended as a supplemental aid to diagnostics. They do not indicate the root cause since more than one (1) component can set the same code.

For example: EEC-IV, OBD I Codes 122 and 123 and EEC-V, OBD II Codes P0122 and P0123 for "TP circuit too low" or "TP circuit too high", limit the condition to the TP circuit, connector, or vehicle harness.

EEC-IV, OBD I Codes: 121, "TP inconsistent with air meter", 124, "TP higher than expected", 125, "TP lower than expected" and OBD II Code P1121, "TP inconsistent with MAF sensor" are a result of a comparison of the TP signal to a given airflow. Any un-metered air (downstream of MAF) that enters the engine, either due to a mechanical situation or electrical sensor condition, may result in these codes. PC/ED Pinpoint Tests will guide you to the root cause and avoid customer repeat repairs.

EEC-IV (OBD I) Codes 124 and 125 are set in memory as follows: Codes 124-125 are a comparison of a given airflow to the TPS voltage (throttle plate position).

Code 124: The PCM has indicated that the airflow rate is too low for the position of the throttle plate angle.

Causes for EEC-IV, OBD I Code 124:

Air bypass solenoid flow low/blocked (MAF may indicate low during the event).

Throttle body obstructed.

EGR flow low.

TPS circuit concern when accompanied by Codes 122 or 123.

BP sensor low.

Code 125: The PCM has indicated that the airflow rate is too high for the position of the throttle plate.

Causes of EEC-IV, OBD I Code 125:

Air bypass solenoid high/stuck open (MAF may indicate high during this event).

Throttle plate not closing.

EGR flow high.

TPS circuit concern when accompanied by Codes 122 or 123.

BP sensor high.

These codes are designed to set while in the part throttle drive mode, and often the MIL light flashes on and off until the condition is gone. In some cases, it is difficult to repeat the codes in a test drive since the PCM requires a long drive time to calculate the error in the system. At other times, it may be difficult to repeat because the condition that set the code may be intermittent. Pinpoint Test G of the PC/ED Manual will guide you to the root cause.

Causes of EEC Codes 122: TPS sensor circuit voltage above maximum.

Causes of EEC codes 123: TPS sensor circuit voltage below minimum.

Harness damage.

Connector damage or water in connector.

Defective TPS, open or short.

Check VREF for correct output.

 

(B) - TROUBLESHOOTING THE TPS

The following is a list of vehicle symptoms which have been associated with the TPS, but can also be related to other vehicle components.

Check engine light

Stalls/quits

Hesitation/stumble

Fast idle

If an EEC error code has identified the TPS as suspect, perform PC/ED Manual pinpoint tests on the TPS.

 

Testing the TPS in the vehicle electrical circuit:

The TPS is supplied with a 5.0 volt reference signal. As the TPS senses throttle plate rotation, the output voltage changes to a value in the range of 0.4 volts to 4.8 volts depending on vehicle application. A voltmeter, New Generation Star Tester (NGS) or Service Bay Diagnostics System (SBDS) is the recommended test equipment for checking the TPS output.

The reason SBDS or NGS are the preferred tools is that they allow TPS voltage monitoring without disturbing the connector. Many conditions can be caused by loose, dirty, oxidized, or poor connections that may correct themselves for a short time if the connector is disturbed during testing. This can mislead technicians into replacing a TPS that is okay, and the true cause, a bad connection, may return at some future time.

Measuring the TPS voltage at idle is key when diagnosing a TPS since most of its operational life is within 10 degrees of idle. Figures 2 and 3 include a guide to TPS output voltages for 1993-95 model year vehicles.

 

see more @ http://web.archive.org/web/20111118012415/http://home.comcast.net/~miesk5/technical_service_bulletins.htm#Throttle%20Position%20Sensor%20(TPS)%20Function%20&%20Diagnosis%20TSB%2094-26-4%20by%20Ford%20for%2093-95

 

175, 176, 177 (HO2S21 lack of switching, Bank 2)

 

 

 

bbl; have to see Doc.

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DTC 172 lean Heated O2; "...Backprobe the MAF (+) and MAF-RTN (-) lines with a DVOM. You should see ~1.0V or slightly less at warm idle. If not, check the +12V and GND lines to make sure there's battery voltage between those terminals with the ignition key turned ON. You also may want to try using the proper spray cleaner on the MAF wires, especially if you have a K&N oily filter (in which case I can almost guarantee there's oily junk on your MAF's wires). Also make certain that the tube(s) leading from the MAF to the throttle body are 100% intact. The red wire (on the right in the first above picture) is supposed to have battery voltage with the key on. Measure between that wire and the one right next to it. You measure the MAF voltage at idle, because the MAF voltage is what's interpreted by the PCM..."

Source: by SigEpBlue http://fullsizebronco.com/forum/showthread.php?t=185521

 

 

DTC 172, 173 or 41 for HO2S failure in TSB 95-02-11 for 92-95 Bronco & F Series; "the HO2S wires in the 12A690 (subassembly of the 14B060 battery cable) harness may be cut on the lower right engine mount causing improper signals to be sent to the PCM. Damage may be under the electrical tape..." SEE MORE ON REPAIR; Miesk5 Note; also see TSB 95-5-21 for 92-95 Bronco & F Series

Source: by Ford via Steve at http://www.supermotors.net/vehicles/registry/media/470456_1

 

 

DTC 172, 173 or 41 for HO2S Failure Or Fuse \"E\" Inoperative, ABS Light On, Back-Up Lamps Inoperative, DRLs Inoperative, MIL On, Inadvertent Self-Test, Speedometer Inoperative & Trailer Battery Charge Relay Inoperative in TSB 95-5-21 for 92-95 Bronco & F Series; "...the HO2S wires in the 12A690 (subassembly of the 14B060 battery cable) harness may become chafed and the vehicle could exhibit any one of the following conditions....Lack of proper HEGO operation may cause, or be the result of a rich or lean fuel condition, which could cause additional heat in the catalyst. Perform self test KOEO and KOER, service any codes. CHECK FOR PROPER HEGO GROUND. If the HEGO ground is good, the following areas may be at fault: ..." READ MORE

Source: by Ford via Steve at http://www.supermotors.net/registry/media/646262

 

 

DTC 332 indicates the EGR valve did not open with the engine stabilized and the EVR solenoid duty cycle present sometime during vehicle operation. Possible causes: "...Obstructed or cracked hose to EGR valve,Icing, Damaged EGR valve, Damaged EVR solenoid harness..."

Source: by Ford via SigEpBlue

 

 

DTC 211 indicates two successive erratic Profile Ignition Pickup (PIP) pulses occurred, resulting in a possible engine miss or stall. Possible causes: Loose wires/connectors. Arcing secondary ignition components (coil, cap, rotor, wires, plugs, etc.). On-board transmitter (2-way radio).*

Source: by Jim at justanswer.com

DTC 211; "...code set when the ignition module fails, the pickup coil inside the distributor, or the engine computer. The most common of the three is the coil inside the distributor..."

Source: by RIP at justanswer.com

 

 

 

DTC 212 (Ignition module circuit failure-SPOUT circuit grounded); "...Check to see if the spout connector is good by running a piece of wire where the connector is supposed to go. If that doesn't help any try checking the wiring all the way until it goes into the connectors..."

Source: by NoSlow5oh

 

DTC 212 - Loss of IDM input to EEC or SPOUT circuit grounded. Continuous Memory DTC 212 indicates a loss of IDM input to the PCM. "..Possible causes: 1. Check for the short to ground possibility in the SPOUT wire (to ECM side and to ICM side) as suggested above. 2. IDM wire from Ignition Control Module (ICM) to ECM integrity (open, short to ground or power). 3. ICM was already replaced 4. If all the above checks OK......the ECM will be the one to blame..."

Source: by Joel5.0

 

DTC 212; "...IDM is a feedback signal generated by the ignition system and is monitored at pin #4 of the ECM. Its purpose is to diagnose missed ignition primary pulses at the time the ECM commands the Spout signal to fire the coil. Since it is used solely for diagnostic purposes, if this circuit is not operating properly, it will not affect vehicle driveability; & by Seattle FSB- The Ignition Diagnostic Monitor (IDM) signal is a diagnostic signal for the PCM to to verify a coil firing for each PIP signal. If an erratic or missing IDM signal is received, a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC 212) is set. An occasional IDM signal may not affect drivability, but can still throw a trouble code. As SigEpBlue has stated, check for an intermittent ground on the spOUT and/or IDM circuit. Also, ensure that you have the correct Ignition Control Module (ICM) and it is wired correctly to the PCM..."

Source: by SMP via SigEpBlue (Steve) & by Seattle FSB (SeattleFSB) at FSB

DTC 213 Spout Circuit Open; "...EZ check first; Ck to see if the SPOUT (Spark Output) connector is missing. da connector is a little "jumper" that fits into two wire connector; located near da distributor (it is removed to adjust timing). Location pic @ distributor by unknown via Jem270 Check to see if it is in-place, if connector/wiring is damaged or corrosion is in conn or wiring..."

Source: by miesk5

 

 

DTC 311 - Thermactor air system inoperable; "...because of the possibility that (following is an excerpt of a condensed discussion of how a bad TAB/TAD/vac line DTC 311 ... and so-on problem could cause the rich aroma; Your smog pump... blows fresh clean air up through a hose to the diverter valve. The solenoid next to the diverter valve which has a .... pink little hose plugged into ... it, creates a vacuum (sucking) that opens up the valve, and allows the fresh air to pass through the valve and make it's way to the exhaust, where the cats burn the unburnt gas more efficiently since this all happens during "open loop mode". Open loop mode happens when you turn on your car and it revs at 1200rpms for the first 15-20 seconds. During this process, your ECU feeds more gas to the engine to warm up the car quickly before driving. (also known as choke on older cars). During this open loop procedure, the extra unburnt gasoline will usually cause your exhaust to smell very rich, and the air that this diverter valve sends to the cats, causes it to burn the extra unburnt gas more efficiently like I mentoined above...thus eliminating the rich gasoline smell that us older mustangs sometimes suffer from..."

Source: by 006 (Speedconcepts) via miesk5 at FSB

 

 

 

DTC 332 EGR valve opening not detected; "When performing computer Self-Test after installing this kit it is normal to get code...The computer is acknowledging that the EGR is permanently closed. This is your desired result. However if you get the following codes: 31 / 327 - EVP circuit failed below the closed EGR limit of 0.24 volts 32 / 328 - EVP circuit failed below the closed EGR limit of 0.24 volts 34 / 334 - EVP circuit failed above the closed EGR limit of 0.67 volts 35 / 337 - EVP circuit failed above the open EGR limit of 4.81 volts;Check your connection again; make sure there is no resistance in the harness;..." in Eliminator Installation Manual

Source: by Ryan M (Fireguy50) at fordfuelinjection.com

DTC 332 & Possible Causes; "...EGR Valve Insufficient EGR Flow; EGR valve sticking closed EGR valve diaphragm leaks; EVR solenoid sticking closed; Loss of vacuum to or from EVR Open in EVR VPWR or driver circuits; Leak or restriction in PFE/DPFE signal hoses..."

Source: by latechsho

 

DTC 332 - Insufficient EGR flow detected. "...Atop the EGR valve there is a sensor called the EVP (EGR Valve Position) sensor. It detects movement of the pintle iside the EGR valve. You can apply vacuum to the vacuum barb on the EGR valve and observe through the holes in the casting whether the valve is moving or not. It may just be dirty which requires some careful scrubbing and NO SOLVENTS. Otherwise, if the EGR valve is functioning and moving when vacuum is applied, the EVP sensor is suspect and the electrical connections to it should be checked first. (Computer needs to know the EGR valve position for emissions control)..."

Source: by greystreak92 (Joe B)

 

211 in Continues Memory- Two or more successive erratic Profile Ignition Pickup (PIP) pulses occurred, resulting in a possible engine miss or stall.

 

212 in Continues Memory-

Loss of IDM input to EEC or SPOUT circuit grounded.

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DTC 211; Hesitation, Stumble, Stall, Miss, No Start, No Spark and/or Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) 211 TSB 95-15-11 in 93-95 (Shorts in Profile Ignition Pickup (PIP) & Spark Output (SPOUT)

http://content.chiltonsonline.com/TSB/displayTSBHandler.ashx?assetID=37119&key=6kAUBD5BruOJf%2f3tgozUqjXM3RdbjcQqW4sVWiE%2fp2IojfpfKqM07dr61%2bQAWHtT%2bshJrOWtEbHVAFIsEaIdE%2fTFOfEKOiDQb7eKlbQRF0xqkEugoEoMIQ%3d%3d

by Ford via Chilton

 

DTC 212 indicates a loss of IDM input to the PCM; "...Open harness circuit. Shorted harness circuit. Damaged Ignition Control Module (ICM). Damaged Powertrain Control Module (PCM)..." READ MORE

http://www.justanswer.com/ford/0sqj6-trouble-codes-fo-1995-ford-f150.html

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From a PM...

 

what would make the idel go up and down when driving it like a humm load soft and my check engine light is always on.how do i get it to go off.

 

 

Art,

 

A surging idle is often caused by a vacuum leak. A vacuum leak may cause your O2 sensor DTC codes to be set.

 

I think at the top of this thread there are tips to locating a vacuum leak.

 

 

 

Miesk5 knows much more about this than I. Your codes suggest a PIP failure, and a ignition module failure. It seems to me that the ignition modules fail at a much higer rate in a 1995, than the pick-up coil inside the dizzy. There is a thread on here about how to test the ignition module, but it is easier to pull it and take to your local auto parts store and have them test it for you.

 

 

 

You mentioned something in another PM about a brake light staying on. First thing to check is your brake fluid level. I don't typically give advice on brakes and would prefer that you take those issus to a shop.

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ok thanks guys for the info. I purchased this bronco a couple of months ago and have change the belt, distributer, cap, rotor, wires, coil, and the pip module. oh and the pulley on the belt tenstioner,AND Fuel filter, and some brake lines, it was my wifes uncles truck how just passed so i have no choose but to fix it.by reading your responce it is sounding more and more like the tps on the carb she runs really good but when you take of the line so goes then Stumbles

when on the road sometime it seems like she is trying to excelerate like if you had it in cruse control and going up a hill but she doesnt go any faster im confused....or/ and ?? thiers a humm in the back and it gets loader then softer or is it comming from the engine i dont know. i really need your guys help. oh one more thing lol just one lol.do you know were i can get the bushing for the front end that bolts up by the radiator on the bottom looks like it is two bushing..

 

thanks

art [-o<[-o<[-o<[-o<[-o<[-o<[-o<

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yo,

As BRONCOJOE advised; check for Vacuum leaks

Joe has vac leak test in his SELF TEST FOR CODES @

http://broncozone.com/topic/14269-code-reader/page__pid__74587__mode__threaded

 

 

Vacuum Gauge Diagnosis Steady gauge 18-20 at all speeds

see more @ http://www.classictruckshop.com/clubs/earlyburbs/projects/vac/uum.htm

 

 

as well as my vac leak Post here in a Zone # http://broncozone.com/topic/22770-low-idle/

 

Suggest buying a vac gauge, best low cost test and MPG helper you can spend $ on;

pic; "...I have a vacuum gauge mounted right in the dash of my truck. I use it to also help determine the load my engine is under while driving, and to estimate fuel economy..."

Source: by William T http://www.fordf150.net/images/mytruck/vacgauge.jpg

 

====

 

Did you get a Code Reader done for Free yet?

 

This is VERY IMPORTANT;

I have many tests for TPS, EGR, EVP etc in my site; it is down now because the data base "HOST" effef up and deleted it as well as my back-up files

 

But confirm the Codes and [post again here and I'll get pin-point tests for each to save you $ at a garage

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Art,

 

Please let's stay on topic about pulling codes and fixing them, and let's not wander too far off track with other topics.

 

i really need your guys help. oh one more thing lol just one lol.do you

know were i can get the bushing for the front end that bolts up by the radiator

on the bottom looks like it is two bushing..

 

 

Please start a new thread for other issues.

Thanks :)

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just did the KOEO test on my '86 bronc with the 302. I'm pretty sure the codes i pulled were 83, 16, 31. can anyone shed some light on that for me?

Edited by johnnyD

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Next we'll do the KeyOnEngineRunning KOER self test.

 

You preheat the engine and turn her off.

Shut off all electrical accessories or disconnect them (radio, CB's, lighting, etc.).

set your jumper wire and start her up.

After you get four flashes, or sweeps (three flashes or sweeps for a 6 cyl).

you depress and release the brake pedal, turn the steering wheel 1/2 turn, push the OD on off switch, THEN after a single flash... snap the throttle (push it all the way to the floor once) See Edit Below.

Then get ready to read your codes.

FYI a code of 11 or 111 is a pass code.

 

 

OK.. time for more ice cream! smile.gif

Now bring your codes here, and we'll help you work it out.

 

EDIT... prior to doing the throttle test, one should wait for the signal to do so. The signal is a single quick flash. Aparrantly some trucks do not require it, and it should not be performed without being prompted to do so.

Great write up this was exactly what I couldn't remember. Thanks for sharing

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