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66-96 Ford Broncos - Early & Full Size
B-Cack

Code Reader.....

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Yoda Joe,

Just to update you on my Bronco... I haven't had time to change out the TPS yet, unfortunately I was stuck at work all week. I did however manage to get some carb cleaner and a new gasket. Thanks again, B-Cack

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Joe,

 

I finally had the time to take off the Throttle body and give it a good cleaning. BOY were you right, that thing was pretty fouled up, I took my time and gently cleaned it out. Put the new Tps sensor on and took it for a test drive. I was amazed at how smooth she drove and it seemed like there was an increase in power as well. Took the boat to the lake today and had a nice time. Thanks B-Cack

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I pulled the codes using your method with the wire and the KOEO im pretty sure I go the pass code, but when i try to do the KOER I get the four flashes the push and release the brake turn the wheel push the OD switch on and of press the gas once and then nothing.... what am I doing wrong?

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I pulled the codes using your method with the wire and the KOEO im pretty sure I go the pass code, but when i try to do the KOER I get the four flashes the push and release the brake turn the wheel push the OD switch on and of press the gas once and then nothing.... what am I doing wrong?

Nick (Outcast),

It seems that the '92 doesn't require one to do the power steering test, ( I guess it should not be done)

Also I was not clear, (in fact did not mention) that prior to doing the throttle test, one should wait for the signal to do so. The signal is a single quick flash. Aparrantly some trucks do not require it, and it should not be performed without being prompted to do so.

 

Please try it again, and let me know how you make out.

Later I'll edit both this post, and the one with the instructions for the KOER test.

 

Thanks for helping me make this better for everyone.

joe

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I just picked up a Innova code reader for 12 bucks new in box. It works great with the digital readout and all the different test you can perform like cylinder balance test. $24 on Amazon and in my mind a great deal. I confuse very easily and this thing made it a dream to pull codes.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Equus-3145-Ford-Digi...r/dp/B000EW0KHW

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So i definetely had luck getting the KOEO code, but the KOER code is a littlle tricky because i dont have an overdrive switch, my Bronco has a manual transmission. Otherwise i got the following codes: 11 11 1 2 11. I have no clue what those mean maybe you could help.

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The 11 s are PASS.. that's good.

the 12 is either operator error, or Cannot control RPM during ER Self-Test high RPM check.

 

What are your symptoms?

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well im pretty sure it was a 1 and a 2, i could be mistaken. At the time the truck started rough, but since i replaced the starter and solenoid its been much better. Havent read the codes since but its a good trick to know! thanks anyways.

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I have read that one may also use a digital voltmeter. I have not tried using a digital one, but I am a little concerned that the one that I have is slow to present its reading and may not do it fast enough for the rate of speed of the flashes.

 

i have had success with a digital meter.

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Hi, i just wanted to say THANK YOU for the awesome post...i solved my f150's rough running problem by following your instructions and by using the link to the code 63 TPS fix.....i had bought a $600 1990 f150 a month ago thinking it had some dead valves or something, but turns out it was an easy fix...thanks again......

northwest illinois

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HEY!

That is great! TY for taking da time to register & log-in here to let Joe know!

 

That helps in this era of folks asking detailed Qs and getting replies that took time for research and entry only to see that the questioner never comes back to da zone to see the info.

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snocone,

You are welcome, I am glad that it helped.

 

Miesk5,

Once again, thanks for all you do!

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Nick (Outcast),

It seems that the '92 doesn't require one to do the power steering test, ( I guess it should not be done)

Also I was not clear, (in fact did not mention) that prior to doing the throttle test, one should wait for the signal to do so. The signal is a single quick flash. Aparrantly some trucks do not require it, and it should not be performed without being prompted to do so.

 

Please try it again, and let me know how you make out.

Later I'll edit both this post, and the one with the instructions for the KOER test.

 

Thanks for helping me make this better for everyone.

joe

 

hey bronco joe i am a little confused on the koer test as well. i dont have a aod swith so i am assuming i skip that step?? the next thing i am confised on is do i wait for the 4 flashs then a single flash to snap the throttle or just the single flash on a 89 351

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Are all 1995 set up this way? I thought 95 was the year they started converting to odbII? Just curious cause I thought my 95 is odbII, but ill double check.

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Joe, great self test step by step. THe only thing i noticed was that my 1990 Bronco doesnt have the OD switch and it takes roughly 30 seconds after you perform the power steering test for the light to blink to indicate the accelerator test.

 

Thanks again!

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Are all 1995 set up this way? I thought 95 was the year they started converting to odbII? Just curious cause I thought my 95 is odbII, but ill double check.

 

your 95 Bronco doesn't have OBD II; unless a prev owner made a swap

some info for you;

 

All cars and light trucks built and sold in the United States after January 1, 1996 were required to be OBD II equipped. In general, this means all 1996 model year cars and light trucks are compliant, even if built in late 1995.

 

Two factors will show if your vehicle is definitely OBD II equipped:

1) There will be an OBD II connector as shown below, and

2) There will be a note on a sticker or nameplate under the hood: "OBD II compliant".

http://www.obdii.com/images/connectorblue.GIF

 

The conn will be under da ashtray

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Yeh I figured it out my 95 is still odb1, but my 95 blazer is odbII.

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it does get confusing at times, huh?

Sometimes I forget what a carb looks like,,,lol

I do miss the 78 tho; maybe I'll get one someday and restore that; but the state wants the dinos off da road here; so I guess we're 1'4--20'ed

 

and my memory is going, going almost gone... the ODB II Connector is under of ashtray, butto right

 

 

Boss Has a cord plugged into it (end rolled up on tranny hum carpet) in this pic

http://www.supermotors.net/getfile/757663/original/dsc_0010.jpg

Edited by miesk5

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For the Key On Engine Running codes you say to press the OD switch which im assuming is for an Automatic transmission. What would the process be for a Manual? I tried to pull the KOER, got half way through, and remembered that i dont have an OD switch :)

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yo; here is da skinny;

"...There are two types of EEC Self-Tests, Key On Engine Off (KOEO) and Key On Engine Running (KOER). \While both of these will test for various "hard faults" that are present when the test is run, the processor continuously monitors various operating parameters whenever the engine is running. If the processor detects a problem, it will store a "Continuous Memory" code and light the MIL. These Continuous Memory codes are put out during KOEO Test after any codes associated with hard faults are output. Self-Test Codes are displayed by flashing the MIL. They are also output as voltage pulses on the Self-Test Output (STO) circuit in the Self-Test connector. In either Self-Test mode, all codes are output twice and in KOEO, the hard fault codes are separated from the Continuous Memory codes by a "separator" pulse.

 

A technician that is unfamiliar with the EEC Self-Test can mistakenly believe that continuous Memory codes are not present when they really are. He may run KOER Test and get a pass code (111) and not realize that KOEO Self-Test must be run to receive any Continuous Memory codes. He may run KOEO Test while counting MIL flashes and misinterpret the repeated hard fault pass code (111) to mean that Continuous Memory does not contain any codes...." READ MORE;

 

"...The self-test plugs were mounted on the passenger side fender on 1985-86 EFI trucks; The self-test plugs are located along the driver's side fender behind the air filter box on 87-95 EFI trucks..."; miesk5 NOTE; Self-Test Input (STI) is the Pin in the Lt gray Connector and Signal Return Ground (STO/SIGRET) is Pin E in black Connector in 87-95;

 

The engine temperature must be greater than 50°F (10°C) to pass the KOEO Test and greater than 180°F (82°C) to pass the KOER Test.

Run it around to heat the engine up and shift thru all gears incl Reverse. Then turn off all accessories/lights, etc. Make sure A/C is off and transmission is in Park (automatic) or in Neutral for a Manual & release clutch. Do Key On Engine Off (KOEO) portion first. On all vehicles equipped with a 4.9L ENGINE, the clutch must be depressed during the KOEO Test. On all vehicles equipped with a 7.3L DIESEL ENGINE, the throttle must be depressed (WOT) during the entire Key On Engine Off Self-Test.

 

Engine ID codes are issued at the beginning of the KOER Test and are one-digit numbers represented by the number of pulses sent out. For gasoline engines, the engine ID code is equal to one-half the number of engine cylinders (i.e. 2 pulses = 4 cylinders). For the 7.3L Diesel engine, the ID code = 5. These codes are used to verify the proper PCM is installed and that the Self-Test has been entered.

 

The dynamic response check is used on some applications to verify operation of the TP, MAF, MAP and KS sensors during the brief Wide-Open Throttle (WOT) performed during the KOER Test. The signal for the operator to perform the brief WOT is a single pulse...

 

On vehicles equipped with Power Steering Pressure (PSP) switch, the steering wheel must be turned one-half turn and released AFTER the ID Code has been displayed. This tests the ability of the EEC system to detect a change of state in the PSP switch...On vehicles equipped with Brake On/Off (BOO) input, the brake pedal MUST be depressed and released AFTER the ID Code has been displayed. This tests the ability of the EEC system to detect a change of state in the Brake Lamp Switch.

 

On vehicles equipped with Transmission Control Switch (TCS) , the switch must be cycled after the ID code has been displayed. This tests the ability of the EEC system to detect a change of state in the TCS. During KOER test; On vehicles equipped with the Brake On/Off (BOO) circuit, the brake pedal MUST be depressed and released AFTER the ID code. On vehicles equipped with the Power Steering Pressure (PSP) switch, within 1 to 2 seconds after the ID code, the steering wheel must be turned at least one-half turn and released. On vehicles equipped with E4OD transmission, the Transmission Control Switch (TCS) must be cycled after the ID code. The Dynamic Response code is a single pulse that occurs 6-20 seconds after the engine running identification code. When/if the Dynamic Response code occurs, perform a brief wide open throttle.

 

Look Codes up in my broncolinks.com site using the new Search function.

 

note that da:

TCS = Transmission Control Indicator Light (TCIL); on E4OD it is ref to as the OD on/off LED/Switch @ end of tranny gear stalk

 

Power Steering Pressure Switch is screwed into the high pressure port of the PS pump(5.0L Only); &

The Power Steering Pressure Switch signals the EEC Module when power steering pressure exceeds 350 psi ±50. The engine then increases idle speed to compensate for the additional load. It appears the switch was deleted from the '94 model year. It only shows up in the diagrams until '93. the switch is directly above the steering box."

Source: by Sportruk

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My friends 1992 E150 6 cylinder van just quit on him while driving on the freeway. While trying to start the engine the engine barely cranks over but if I jumped the Starter Solenoid it would crank over really good but even with the Key in the run position it would not start and run. I replaced the Ignition Switch and Starter Solenoid but that was no help. It is still the same (although slightly better due to the new contacts). I will try to check the codes when I get back out there today. Does anyone have any ideas other then the battery? The battery checks out on a load tester although the voltage does drop to about 8 volts while cranking so I am going to be trying a new battery just in case that is the issue. It seems to me, that it took 9V minimum so fire an electronic ignition. We have been trying to use a battery charger with a start feature.

 

In any case, I cant do a KOER test because we cant get the engine running. Any help would be appreciated!

 

Thanks,

 

Joe

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I just pulled codes on 1989 with 5.8 efi code 63 over and over can you tell me what it stands for ! thank you

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yo D,

DTC 63 Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) voltage too low.

Bad or misadjusted TPS,

TB base idle mis-set,

binding throttle cable

Suspect open TP sensor, or wiring/harness issues such as connector/terminal corrosion, etc.

 

Test by Ryan M

slow to load

 

for following, use this diagram by beetlejuice[/url];

TPS is on right side, about middle of page

1236.jpg

 

&

Connector Pin Outs, Bronco & Ford Truck in 85-95

eecconnectors.jpg

Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net

 

Key off.

l TP sensor disconnected.

Key on, engine off.

Measure voltage between VREF circuit and SIG RTN circuit at the TP sensor vehicle harness connector.

Is voltage between 4.0 and 6.0 volts?

Yes, REPLACE TP sensor. RERUN Quick Test.

No, Key off. RECONNECT all components. GO to Pinpoint Test Step C1.

 

C1 CHECK VEHICLE BATTERY POWER CIRCUIT;

Key off.

Disconnect Powertrain Control Module (PCM).

Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires, etc. Service as necessary.

Install breakout box and connect PCM to breakout box.

 

breakout box test pins numbers are same as EEC's pin numbers:

 

 

Key on, engine off.

Measure voltage between Test Pin 37 at the breakout box and SIG RTN circuit in the Data Link Connector (DLC).

Note voltage.

Measure voltage across battery terminals.

Note voltage. Are both voltages greater than 10.5 volts, and are both voltages within 1.0 volt of each other?

Yes, GO to C2.

No Key Off, RECONNECT sensor (if applicable).

GO to B1.

I don't have the B2 nor C2, yet.

so,

 

A NON-Ford NEW TPS failure is sad to say, a common nuisance; I had a new switch fall apart in my hands recently, as well as other crapola parts from CH...

 

 

Also TSB 89-14-07 TPS Screws

Publication Date: JULY 14, 1989

 

FORD: 1983-89 CROWN VICTORIA, MUSTANG, TEMPO, THUNDERBIRD

1984-89 ESCORT

1986-89 TAURUS

LINCOLN-MERCURY: 1983-89 CONTINENTAL, COUGAR, GRAND MARQUIS, MARK VII, TOPAZ, TOWN CAR

1984-87 LYNX

MERKUR: 1985-89 ALL MERKUR LINES

LIGHT TRUCK: 1983-89 ALL LIGHT TRUCK LINES

 

ISSUE: All Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) mounting screws have a "Pozidrive" head. The "Pozidrive" head looks a lot like a Phillips screw head. Use of a Phillips head screwdriver to remove a "Pozidrive" screw will normally result in a rounded or damaged screw head. Many technicians think it is an overtorqued or "frozen" screw. An adhesive was also used as a thread sealant starting with the 1988 model year. This adhesive requires still more effort to loosen and remove the screw.

 

ACTION: To prevent rounded or damaged screw heads when servicing the TPS mounting screws, technicians should always use a #2 "Pozidrive" screwdriver.

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yo D,

DTC 63 Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) voltage too low.

Bad or misadjusted TPS,

TB base idle mis-set,

binding throttle cable

Suspect open TP sensor, or wiring/harness issues such as connector/terminal corrosion, etc.

 

Test by Ryan M

slow to load

 

for following, use this diagram by beetlejuice[/url];

TPS is on right side, about middle of page

1236.jpg

 

&

Connector Pin Outs, Bronco & Ford Truck in 85-95

eecconnectors.jpg

Source: by Steve83 (Steve, That dirty old truck) at SuperMotors.net

 

Key off.

l TP sensor disconnected.

Key on, engine off.

Measure voltage between VREF circuit and SIG RTN circuit at the TP sensor vehicle harness connector.

Is voltage between 4.0 and 6.0 volts?

Yes, REPLACE TP sensor. RERUN Quick Test.

No, Key off. RECONNECT all components. GO to Pinpoint Test Step C1.

 

C1 CHECK VEHICLE BATTERY POWER CIRCUIT;

Key off.

Disconnect Powertrain Control Module (PCM).

Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires, etc. Service as necessary.

Install breakout box and connect PCM to breakout box.

 

breakout box test pins numbers are same as EEC's pin numbers:

 

 

Key on, engine off.

Measure voltage between Test Pin 37 at the breakout box and SIG RTN circuit in the Data Link Connector (DLC).

Note voltage.

Measure voltage across battery terminals.

Note voltage. Are both voltages greater than 10.5 volts, and are both voltages within 1.0 volt of each other?

Yes, GO to C2.

No Key Off, RECONNECT sensor (if applicable).

GO to B1.

I don't have the B2 nor C2, yet.

so,

 

A NON-Ford NEW TPS failure is sad to say, a common nuisance; I had a new switch fall apart in my hands recently, as well as other crapola parts from CH...

 

 

Also TSB 89-14-07 TPS Screws

Publication Date: JULY 14, 1989

 

FORD: 1983-89 CROWN VICTORIA, MUSTANG, TEMPO, THUNDERBIRD

1984-89 ESCORT

1986-89 TAURUS

LINCOLN-MERCURY: 1983-89 CONTINENTAL, COUGAR, GRAND MARQUIS, MARK VII, TOPAZ, TOWN CAR

1984-87 LYNX

MERKUR: 1985-89 ALL MERKUR LINES

LIGHT TRUCK: 1983-89 ALL LIGHT TRUCK LINES

 

ISSUE: All Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) mounting screws have a "Pozidrive" head. The "Pozidrive" head looks a lot like a Phillips screw head. Use of a Phillips head screwdriver to remove a "Pozidrive" screw will normally result in a rounded or damaged screw head. Many technicians think it is an overtorqued or "frozen" screw. An adhesive was also used as a thread sealant starting with the 1988 model year. This adhesive requires still more effort to loosen and remove the screw.

 

ACTION: To prevent rounded or damaged screw heads when servicing the TPS mounting screws, technicians should always use a #2 "Pozidrive" screwdriver.

Thamk you I will let you know how i make out! also thanks for the heads up on pozidrive !!

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Thank you I will let you know how i make out! also thanks for the heads up on pozidrive !!

Also is there a trick to get to the two pozidrive screews?? Thanks again !

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