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66-96 Ford Broncos - Early & Full Size

miesk5

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  1. Accelerator Pedal SECTION 310-02: Acceleration Control 2008 Crown Victoria/Grand Marquis Workshop Manual REMOVAL AND INSTALLATION Procedure revision date: 02/11/2008 Accelerator Pedal Removal and Installation Item Part Number Description 1 14A464 Accelerator pedal sensor electrical connector 2 W506015 Accelerator pedal bolts (2 required) 3 9N972 Accelerator pedal ➡️➡️ NOTE NOTE: To prevent setting DTCs, make sure the ignition switch is in the OFF position prior to disconnecting the accelerator pedal sensor electrical connectors. Disconnect the accelerator pedal sensor electrical connector. Remove the 2 bolts and the accelerator pedal assembly. To install, tighten to 9 Nm (80 lb-in). To install, reverse the removal procedure Acceleration Control; The acceleration controls consist of the accelerator pedal and sensor assembly. The engine management system electronically operates the throttle of the engine in response to accelerator pedal movements initiated by the driver. In the event of a system failure, the engine management system provides a "limp home" mode whichallows the car to be driven with limited performance. ANY CODES? No Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) Present Symptom Chart Index NO CODES System/Symptom Oasis Number Chart Number Stalls/Quits Idle/Acceleration/Cruise 607x00 Chart Number: 1 Deceleration 607700 Chart Number: 6 Stall after start 607000 Chart Number: 1 Runs Rough 608x00 Chart Number: 1 Misses 609x00 Chart Number: 1 Buck/Jerk 610x00 Chart Number: 1 Hesitation/Stumble 611x00 Chart Number: 1 ➡️Surge 612x00 Chart Number: 1 Backfires 613x00 Chart Number: 7 ➡️➡️Lack/Loss of Power 614x00 Chart Number: 8 Spark Knock 615x00 Chart Number: 9 NOTE Note: OASIS identifiers (the x means any number (1-9) can be used) xxx4xx equals during idle, xxx5xx equals during acceleration, xxx6xx equals during cruise, xxx7xx equals during deceleration. Charts 2008 PCED Gasoline Engines SECTION 3: Symptom Charts Procedure revision date: 12/20/2011 No Diagnostic Trouble Codes (DTCs) Present Symptom Charts Chart 1 Stalls/Quits: Idle, Acceleration, Cruise, Stall After Start Runs Rough Misses Buck/Jerk Hesitation/Stumble ➡️Surge Unique Idle Concerns: Rolling Idle NOTE Note: For some vehicle applications, the engine may stall if left running while refueling. Advise the customer to turn the engine off while refueling to avoid contamination or damage to the evaporative emission (EVAP) system. SYSTEM/COMPONENT REFERENCE (Section 5 Pinpoint Test unless noted) Check the following parameter identifiers (PIDs): DPFEGR (if equipped) (hot idle value within 0.15 volt of the key ON, engine OFF value) LONGFT1/LONGFT2 (value between -20 and +20%) VPWR (value between 10.5 and 17.0 volts, and within 0.5 volt of battery voltage) DPFEGR PID value not within 0.15 volt of key ON, engine OFF value: For vehicles equipped with an exhaust gas recirculation system module (ESM), GO to Pinpoint Test HH. For all others, GO to Pinpoint Test HE. LONGFT1/LONGFT2 value low (-): Continue diagnosis. Concentrate checks in areas that would cause the engine to run rich. LONGFT1/LONGFT2 value high (+): Continue diagnosis. Concentrate checks in areas that would cause the engine to run lean. VPWR not between 10.5 and 17.0 volts: REFER to the Workshop Manual Section 414-00, Charging System and carry out the Inspection and Verification to continue diagnosis. VPWR between 10.5 and 17.0 volts, but not within 0.5 volt of battery voltage: CHECK the B+ voltage to the powertrain control module (PCM) power relay. CHECK the VPWR circuit between the PCM and the PCM power relay. CHECK the PWR GND circuits. For vehicles that run rough at idle: Check the INJx_F PIDs (the "x" indicates the injector number) with the key ON, engine running. There is 1 INJx_F PID for each engine cylinder. All INJx_F PIDs must indicate no fault (or NO). The INJx_F PID(s) indicate a fault (an injector circuit concern is indicated), GO to Pinpoint Test KG. Mass Air Flow (MAF) Sensor GO to Pinpoint Test DC. Secondary Ignition System For vehicles equipped with a coil pack ignition system, GO to Pinpoint Test JC. For all others, GO to Pinpoint Test JB. Fuel Delivery System GO to Pinpoint Test HC. Exhaust System GO to Pinpoint Test HF. Positive Crankcase Ventilation (PCV) System GO to Pinpoint Test HG. EVAP System GO to Pinpoint Test HX. Charging System GO to Pinpoint Test HY. Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) (for Taurus, Taurus X, Sable PZEVs) GO to Pinpoint Test DZ. Automatic Transmission REFER to the Workshop Manual Section 307-01, Automatic Transmission/Transaxle diagnostic strategy to continue diagnosis. Base Engine REFER to the Workshop Manual Section 303-00, Engine System and carry out the Inspection and Verification to continue diagnosis. Intake Air System GO to Pinpoint Test HU. A/C Pressure (ACP) Transducer Sensor GO to Pinpoint Test DS. Additional Testing GO to Pinpoint Test Z. Additional Checks: Some vehicles have a TQ_CNTRL PID available. Check this PID to determine if the PCM is reducing torque, and if so, why the torque is being reduced. As a PID display example; 0 equals no torque reduction requested, 1 equals torque truncation, which cuts fuel to protect when line pressure falls to minimum limit and 2 equals traction control event, which cuts fuel/spark for traction control. Correct PCM vehicle identification (VID) block information. Refer to Section 2, Flash Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory (EEPROM) to carry out the Making Changes to the VID Block procedure. Be aware of engine RPM/speed limiting functions of the PCM (look for incorrect high vehicle speed signal from ABS, VSS, or OSS). Drivelines Manual transmission/clutch Charging system Traction control system (if equipped) A/C system (for surge with A/C on) Speed control system (for surge with speed control on) A/C compressor diode, if equipped (for rolling idle) REFER to the applicable Workshop Manual section. Chart 8 Lack/Loss of Power NOTE Note: Verify the symptom is reported under normal driving conditions without excessive engine or vehicle load. Also, be aware of the engine RPM/speed limiting functions of the PCM. NOTE Note: For vehicles equipped with a knock sensor, a lack of power may result when the vehicle is operated with a breakout box installed at the PCM. The knock sensor circuits are not shielded in the breakout box, and knock sensor signal noise may be noticed by the PCM. If this happens, spark timing is retarded and a lack of power may result. NOTE Note: For applications with a knock sensor, a lack of power may result if the engine has developed an abnormal noise. The knock sensors may interpret some abnormal noise as detonation and retard spark timing. SYSTEM/COMPONENT REFERENCE (Section 5 Pinpoint Test unless noted) Automatic Transmission Fluid Visual Throttle Linkage Visual Air Cleaner Element Visual Check the following PIDS: LONGFT1/LONGFT2 (value between -20 and +20%) IMTVF (if equipped): For both key ON, engine OFF and key ON, engine running with the transmission in PARK/NEUTRAL and the engine RPM greater than 3,000 RPM, the PID should indicate no fault (or NO) in both situations. LONGFT1/LONGFT2 value low (-): Continue diagnosis. Concentrate checks in areas that would cause the engine to run rich. LONGFT1/LONGFT2 value high (+): Continue diagnosis. Concentrate checks in areas that would cause the engine to run lean. IMTVF PID indicates a fault: GO to Pinpoint Test HU. Fuel Delivery System GO to Pinpoint Test HC. Secondary Ignition For vehicles equipped with a coil pack ignition system, GO to Pinpoint Test JC. For all others, GO to Pinpoint Test JB. MAF Sensor GO to Pinpoint Test DC. Exhaust System GO to Pinpoint Test HF. Variable Camshaft Timing (VCT) System GO to Pinpoint Test HK. Accelerator Pedal Position Sensor GO to Pinpoint Test DK. Base Engine REFER to the Workshop Manual Section 303-00, Engine System and carry out the Inspection and Verification to continue diagnosis. Automatic Transmission REFER to the Workshop Manual Section 307-01, Automatic Transmission/Transaxle diagnostic strategy to continue diagnosis. Brake System Drag or Binding REFER to the Workshop Manual Section 206-00, Brake System. Supercharger Bypass System GO to Pinpoint Test KJ. Additional Testing GO to Pinpoint Test Z. Additional Checks: Some vehicles have a TQ_CNTRL PID available. Check this PID to determine if the PCM is reducing torque, and if so, why the torque is being reduced. As a PID display example; 0 equals no torque reduction requested, 1 equals torque truncation, which cuts fuel to protect when line pressure falls to minimum limit, and 2 equals traction control event, which cuts fuel/spark for traction control. Customer driving habits Correct PCM vehicle identification (VID) block information. Refer to Section 2, Flash Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory (EEPROM) to carry out the Making Changes to the VID Block procedure. Intake manifold runner control (IMRC) linkage (if equipped) Clutch (M/T) Charging system Engine RPM/speed limiting functions of the PCM (look for incorrect high vehicle speed signal from ABS, VSS, or OSS) Visual. REFER to the applicable Workshop Manual section. Additional Driveability Concerns DK: Accelerator Pedal Position (APP) Sensor: Note: After clearing an APP sensor diagnostic trouble code (DTC) to verify a repair or an intermittent concern, apply the accelerator pedal before carrying out the self-test. Take 10 seconds to carry out a full sweep of the accelerator pedal from fully released to fully applied and back to fully released. This pinpoint test is intended to diagnose the following: accelerator pedal position (APP) sensor (9F836) harness circuits: ETCRTN, SIGRTN, ETCREF, APP1, APP2, and APP3 powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650) Accelerator Pedal Position (APP) Sensor Connector A Click to Enlarge B Click to Enlarge C Click to Enlarge Vehicle Connector Pin Circuit Focus A 5 2 3, 4 1, 6 APP2 APP1 ETCRTN ETCREF Fusion, Milan, MKZ B 4 5 7 6, 9 10, 8 APP3 APP2 APP1 ETCRTN ETCREF All other vehicles C 8 5 2 1, 3 6, 7 APP3 APP2 APP1 ETCRTN ETCREF Powertrain Control Module (PCM) Connector For PCM connector views or reference values, refer to Reference Values. Vehicle Connector Pin Circuit Crown Victoria, Grand Marquis, Mustang, Town Car 170 Pin B41, B6, E59 B24, B4, E66 B35, B36 B28 B17 B5 ETCRTN ETCREF VPWR APP3 APP2 APP1 E-Series, F-Super Duty 170 Pin B18, B6, E59 B16, B4, E66 B35, B36 B28 B17 B5 ETCRTN ETCREF VPWR APP3 APP2 APP1 Expedition, Navigator 140 Pin B59, B65, E59 B21, B28, E66 B51, B52, B53 B27 B26 B25 ETCRTN ETCREF VPWR APP3 APP2 APP1 Explorer, Explorer Sport Trac, Mountaineer 170 Pin B43, B6, E59 B24, B4, E66 B35, B36 B28 B17 B5 ETCRTN ETCREF VPWR APP3 APP2 APP1 F-150, Mark LT 190 Pin B58, B59, E59 B21, B28, E66 B51, B52, B53 B27 B26 B25 ETCRTN ETCREF VPWR APP3 APP2 APP1 Focus 190 Pin B44, B60, E60 B45, B61, E59 B67, B68 B29 B28 ETCRTN ETCREF VPWR APP2 APP1 Fusion, Milan, MKZ 140 Pin B59, B60, E59 B21, B28, E66 B51, B52 B27 B26 B25 ETCRTN ETCREF VPWR APP3 APP2 APP1 All other vehicles 190 Pin B59, B65, E59 B21, B28, E66 B51, B52, B53 B27 B26 B25 ETCRTN ETCREF VPWR APP3 APP2 APP1 DK1 CHECK FOR DIAGNOSTIC TROUBLE CODES (DTCS) Are DTCs P1575, P2104, P2121, P2122, P2123, P2126, P2127, P2128, P2131, P2132, P2133, or P2138 present? Yes No For DTC P1575, GO to DK2. For all others, GO to DK4. For a lack/loss of power, GO to DK3. For all others, GO to Section 4, Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) Charts and Descriptions. DK2 DTC P1575: REPEAT THE KOEO SELF-TEST Key ON, engine OFF. Carry out the KOEO self-test. Are any DTCs present other than P1575? Yes No DISREGARD the current diagnostic trouble code (DTC) at this time. DIAGNOSE the next DTC. GO to Section 4, Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) Charts and Descriptions. GO to DK3. DK3 CHECK THE ACCELERATOR PEDAL FOR OBSTRUCTION Key ON, engine OFF. Press the accelerator pedal fully to the floor and release. Does the pedal move freely to the floor and back? Yes No GO to DK4. ISOLATE and REPAIR the obstruction. CLEAR the DTCs. REPEAT the self-test. DK4 CHECK THE APP SENSOR SIGNAL VOLTAGE RANGES FOR THE ACCELERATOR PEDAL FULLY APPLIED AND RELEASED POSITIONS Access the PCM and monitor the APP1, APP2 and APP3 PIDs. Press the accelerator pedal fully to the floor and release. Vehicle APP1 APP2 APP3 E-Series 0.73 - 1.28 3.03 - 4.55 2.59 - 3.89 Expedition, Navigator 0.79 - 2.09 2.75 - 4.33 2.26 - 3.73 Explorer, Explorer Sport Trac, Mountaineer 0.60 - 1.57 3.07 - 4.50 2.57 - 3.89 F-150, Mark LT 0.60 - 1.57 3.07 - 4.50 2.57 - 3.89 F-Super Duty 0.28 - 0.97 3.45 - 4.71 2.95 - 4.10 Focus 3.69 - 4.60 1.75 - 2.40 - Fusion, Milan, MKZ 1.20 - 2.50 2.50 - 3.94 2.00 - 3.33 All others 0.48 - 1.76 2.95 - 4.62 2.43 - 4.02 Vehicle APP1 APP2 APP3 Focus 0.70 - 0.90 0.30 - 0.50 - All vehicles 3.43 - 4.69 1.13 - 1.88 0.64 - 1.28 Accelerator Pedal Fully Applied Voltage ValuesAccelerator Pedal Fully Released Voltage Values Are all APP signals out of range for the pedal fully applied and released positions? Yes No GO to DK5. For continuous memory DTCs P2121 and P2126 with P2131, GO to DK24. For all others, GO to DK5. DK5 CHECK THE VREF VOLTAGE TO APP SENSOR Key in OFF position. APP Sensor connector disconnected. Key ON, engine OFF. Measure the voltage between: ( + ) APP Sensor Connector, Harness Side ( - ) APP Sensor Connector, Harness Side ETCREF ETCRTN Is the voltage between 4 - 6 V? Yes No For E-Series, Explorer, Explorer Sport Trac, F-150, Mark LT, and Mountaineer, GO to DK6. For F-Super Duty, GO to DK7. For Fusion, Milan, and MKZ, GO to DK10. For Focus with DTC P2122, P2123, or P2138, GO to DK12. For Focus with DTC P2127 or P2128, GO to DK16. For all others, GO to DK11. GO to Pinpoint Test C. DK6 E-SERIES, EXPLORER, EXPLOREReen: (+) APP Sensor Connector, Component Side (-) APP Sensor Connector, Component Side Minimum Resistance (ohms) Maximum Resistance (ohms) APP1 ETCREF 550 1,390 APP1 ETCRTN 1,030 2,590 APP1 APP2 2,125 5,335 APP1 APP3 1,930 4,845 APP2 ETCREF 1,785 4,480 APP2 ETCRTN 1,475 3,705 APP2 APP3 2,520 6,330 APP3 ETCREF 1,620 4,070 APP3 ETCRTN 1,135 2,860 ETCREF ETCRTN 780 1,955 ETCREF ETCREF 0 10 ETCRTN ETCRTN 0 10 Are all the resistances within specifications? Yes No For DTCs P2121, P2122 or P2123 alone or in combination, GO to DK12. For DTCs P2126, P2127 or P2128 alone or in combination, GO to DK16. For DTCs P2131, P2132 or P2133 alone or in combination, GO to DK20. For DTC P2104 alone, GO to DK30. For a lack/loss of power, the concern is elsewhere. RETURN to Symptom Charts, Symptom Charts for further direction. For all others, GO to DK24. INSTALL a new APP sensor. REFER to the Workshop Manual Section 310-02, Acceleration Control to INSTALL a new accelerator pedal. CLEAR the DTCs. REPEAT the self-test. ●●● Joe, I'll stop here for now in this test. System/Symptom Oasis Number Chart Number Stalls/Quits Idle/Acceleration/Cruise 607x00 Chart Number: 1 Deceleration 607700 Chart Number: 6 Stall after start 607000 Chart Number: 1 Runs Rough 608x00 Chart Number: 1 Misses 609x00 Chart Number: 1 Buck/Jerk 610x00 Chart Number: 1 Hesitation/Stumble 611x00 Chart Number: 1 Surge 612x00 Chart Number: 1 Backfires 613x00 Chart Number: 7 Lack/Loss of Power 614x00 Chart Number: 8 Spark Knock 615x00 Chart Number: 9 NOTE Note: OASIS identifiers (the x means any number (1-9) can be used) xxx4xx equals during idle, xxx5xx equals during acceleration, xxx6xx equals during cruise, xxx7xx equals during deceleration.
  2. Yo buddy, For posterity: Fan Clutch Test Spin the fan. A light resistance should be felt. If there is no resistance or very high resistance, the minimum and maximum fan speeds must be checked as follows: Refer to Fan Clutch Specifications at the end of this section. Minimum Fan Clutch Requirement Test — Cold WARNING: TO AVOID THE POSSIBILITY OF PERSONAL INJURY OR DAMAGE TO THE VEHICLE, DO NOT OPERATE THE ENGINE UNTIL THE FAN HAS BEEN FIRST EXAMINED FOR POSSIBLE CRACKS AND SEPARATION. Using a suitable marker, mark the water pump pulley (8509), one of the fan blade retaining bolts and the crankshaft pulley (6312). Connect a tachometer to the engine. Install a throttle adjusting tool. Connect a Sun Strobe Light or equivalent. This can be an SLT-1 or SLT-2 Strobotach or an STA-1 Strobe Trigger adapter for the Sun Distributor Test Stand. A Digital Photoelectric Tachometer 055-00108 or equivalent may also be used for this test. Start the engine and run it at approximately 1500 rpm until engine temperature has normalized. Adjust the engine to the testing speed in the Specificationsat the end of this section. Operate the strobe light at water pump test speed and aim it at the water pump pulley. Adjust the engine speed until the light flashes and the water pump pulley marks are synchronized. Aim the timing light at the fan retaining bolts. Adjust the strobe light until it is synchronized with the marked fan retaining bolt (fan appears to stand still). The fan speed must not be greater than the specified fan test speed at water pump test speed. Turn the engine OFF. If the fan speed was greater than the specified fan test speed, check for proper parts usage. If the correct parts are used, replace the fan clutch (8A616). If the part(s) are not the correct ones, replace the part(s) and perform the test again. If the engaged fan clutch requirement test is going to be performed, do not remove the tachometer, strobe light or throttle adjusting tool. If a Maximum Speed Fan Clutch Requirement test is not going to be performed, remove the tachometer, strobe light and throttle adjusting tool. Maximum Speed Fan Clutch Requirement Test WARNING: TO AVOID THE POSSIBILITY OF PERSONAL INJURY OR DAMAGE TO THE VEHICLE, DO NOT OPERATE THE ENGINE WITH THE HOOD OPEN UNTIL THE FAN HAS BEEN FIRST EXAMINED FOR POSSIBLE CRACKS AND SEPARATION. If the disengaged fan clutch requirement test was not performed, follow Steps 1 through 5 under Minimum Speed Fan Clutch Requirement test. Block off areas on each side of the radiator in the engine compartment and the front of the radiator grille (8200), this will raise the temperature of the air striking the fan clutch and should cause the fan blade to operate at maximum speed. Place the air conditioning selector, if so equipped, in the maximum position and the blower switch in the high position. Adjust the strobe light to water pump test speed. Start the engine and adjust it until the water pump pulley is synchronized with the strobe light. This will be near the engine testing speed given in Specifications. Synchronize the timing light with the fan to fan clutch retaining bolt. The fan speed must meet or exceed the specified minimum fan blade test speed at water pump test speed. If the fan speed was less than the specified fan test speed, replace the fan clutch. By Ford in 1996 Bronco Workshop Manual @http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/manual/stj/stj33014.htm#extract_577
  3. Yo, Maybe Dana knows. Wonder if ownership was changed when the title, "Jeff's Bronco Graveyard" was changed to just "Bronco Graveyard"? Although in the "About Us" section, "Jeff's Bronco Graveyard" is used... I may waste some time and send then an e mail asking why shipping is applied to individual parts instead of total weight and size of an order.
  4. Yo Richard, The Bronco still look great and you have a very good friend! We're working on our tailgate now, the handles interlock rod bracket sucuumbed to rust, so bought and new bracket, screws and key cylinder. Screws were a buck, but Broncograveyard charged over $5.00 For shipping!!! The bracket was over $5.00 For shipping too, all in same little package!!!! Frig em!!!!!!! No more, ever! Be well in your new abode Richard!
  5. Yo B, Following from 96 Bronco Workshop Manual @ http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/manual/stj/stj71a31.htm#collin71a Transmission Fluid Cooler Tubes, F-250, F-350, F-Super Duty, Bronco, 5.0L, 5.8L, 7.5L Item Part Number Description 1 7A095 Transmission Fluid Cooler 2 8005 Radiator 3 7A031 Fluid Cooler Tube 4 7D273 Fluid Tube Connector 5 372223-S101 C-Clip 6 7N291 Transmission Fluid Cooler Line Clip 7 7A030 Fluid Cooler Inlet Tube 8 — Connector (Part of 7000) 9 7000 Automatic Transmission 10 376240-S Clamp 11 N809635-S165A Hose 12 7F113 Inlet Tube 13 7F112 Outlet Tube A — Tighten to 23.3-31.7 Nm (17-23.4 Lb-Ft) B — Tighten to 3.1-4.3 Nm (27.4-38 Lb-In) C — Tighten to 10-14 Nm (7.4-10.3 Lb-Ft) See more info on the cooler such as Overview, Transmission Fluid Cooler Tube Replacement, & Backflushing. @ http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/manual/stj/sBACKFLUSHING. □ My vision is off, so Compare to E4OD Transmission, F-250, F-350, F-Super Duty, Bronco, 5.0L, 5.8L, 7.5L Click to Enlarge Item Part Number Description 1 7A095 Transmission Fluid Cooler 2 8005 Radiator 3 7A031 Fluid Cooler Tube 4 7D273 Fluid Tube Connector 5 372223-S101 C-Clip 6 7N291 Transmission Fluid Cooler Line Clip 7 7A030 Fluid Cooler Inlet Tube 8 — Connector (Part of 7000) 9 7000 Automatic Transmission 10 376240-S Clamp 11 N809635-S165A Hose 12 7F113 Inlet Tube 13 7F112 Outlet Tube A — Tighten to 23-31 Nm (17-23 Lb-Ft) B — Tighten to 3.1-4.3 Nm (27.4-38.0 Lb-In) C — Tighten to 10-14 Nm (7-11 Lb-Ft) by Automobile Repair Reference Center (ARRC) ● Fluid Cooler Hose(s) Removal Place a drain pan under the fluid cooler hose to be removed. Loosen the fluid cooler hose clamps. Remove the fluid cooler hose. Installation To install, reverse the removal procedure. Replenish transmission fluid to proper operating levels. Start engine and check for leaks. Tighten the fluid cooler hose clamps to 3.1-4.3 Nm (27.4-38 lb-in). by Automobile Repair Reference Center (ARRC) ■ E4OD/4R100 Fitting Location Thread Size Flow Direction Front ¼" Pipe Cooler feed/out Rear ¼" Pipe Return/in by TCI @ http://web.archive.org/web/20091001062736/http://www.tciauto.com/Products/TechInfo/cooler_fittings.asp#Ford ■ Also see Cooler, Factory Tow Package & Transmission Temperature Gauge info & pics in a 94 Source: by pfun41 at https://www.supermotors.net/registry/21779/73056-2 Al
  6. Yo Griff, Yes! Check out https://shop.broncograveyard.com/Door-Hinges-Locks/products/603/ 1992-1995 Ford Bronco and F-Series Truck Door Lock Cylinders With Keys Chrome Item Number: 34375 Unit Price: $38.00 Quantity New 1992-95 Ford Bronco 1992-95 Ford F150, F250, F350 Chrome Finish PAIR Detailed Description Key cylinders and keys, comes with lock cylinder clips 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995 Ford Bronco 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995 Ford Truck F150, F250, F350 DL-53 Committed to being the best, Standard Engine Management manufactures and distributes a full line of engine management related products, including ignition and emission parts, on-board computers, ignition wires, battery cables and fuel system parts. All door locks are perfectly matched to the original for precision installation Professional quality construction using solid brass tumblers, chrome plated brass keys, die-cast zinc lock cores and multiple, randomly assigned key codes ensures superior operation Decades of industry leading research and development focused on meeting the technicians needs With industry leading expertise, when original equipment fails our products are designed to fix the inherent failure issues Standard is a global manufacturer of original equipment ignition products, complete quality control is maintained through the manufacturing process from componentry to finished product Watch the ridiculous shipping charge for, 1980-1997 Ford Bronco and F-Series Truck Door Lock Cylinder Clip Item Number: 34375C Unit Price: $8.00 Quantity New 1996 Ford Bronco 1996 Ford F100, F150 1996-97 F250, F350 Can Ship For $7.55 By Selecting PRM On Shipping Option At Checkout ■●■ I bought 3 small tailgate internal parts, lower torsion bar bracket, screws and that cylinder clip. All came in a 5x5" box. Tailgate Lower Torsion Bar Bracket Bolts (2) Item Number: 38287 ➡️Unit Price: $1.00 Quantity New 1980-96 Ford Bronco ➡️ Ship For $7.55 By Selecting PRM On Shipping Option At Checkout Rip-Off!!!!!!
  7. Yo B, 3/8" NPT do you have a pic of the emission vacuum tree location?
  8. Yo B, Consider using a Kragen or Dorman or equivalent new t stat housing that has a temp 9sender port on the top of it. following by Seattle FSB:for a gauge, but equivalent; "Water temperature sensor: How to tap and install --------------------------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: This will be overly detailed so as to try to give people more data with less questions as opposed to the opposite. The job is not hard, regardless of the detail.Every aftermarket temperature gauge on the market requires a temperature sender to get it's readings. They work by using a variable resistor inside the sender that changes resistance based on water temperature. By sending voltage through the sender and comparing the returned voltage to the sent voltage can determine the actual water temp as the water temp varying the resistance results in a different output voltage. This is precisely how the gauge or control unit works to display the proper temperature (it has been calibrated to the response of the sensor already).There are multiple places to mount the temperature sender such as the throttle body coolant lines, upper radiator hose, engine block, or thermostat housing. The goal is to obtain a location where one can have accurate readings but more importantly readings which are capable of a high rate of change. Ideally the best place would be in the water pump housing or in a block coolant passage right after the thermostat. Unfortunately due to physical design issues of the thermosensor and clearances, the water pump and/or block are a bad idea.Almost all of the sensors out there are 1/8 NPT size threaded probes with the electrical harnesson the external portion.Pros/Cons of locations:1. Throttle Body coolant lines.Pros: Easy to do. You can use a freely available tee-line with a 1/8 NPT tap in the tee to install the sensor. Reasonably accurate block coolant temperatures regardless of the thermostat state.Cons: Slow rate of change. Less room for installation when the TB coolant lines are commonly bypassed. No advantage over the other locations except for ease of installation. Due to the flow of coolant through the block, this is really only showing you temperatures indicative of coolant passing through about half the block, post-radiator cooled. Grounding issues.2. Upper radiator hose.Pros: High rate of change when the thermostat is open. Harder to find a tee-line adapter for the size of the radiator hose compared to the throttle body.Cons: Somewhat useless when the thermostat is closed as the readings are more stagnant. This can be an issue when one has a stuck thermostat. In addition we are really interested in the sum of block AND post-radiator temperatures which this location isn't best for. Grounding issues.3. Thermostat housing.Pros: High rate of change when thermostat is open. Medium rate of change when thermostat is closed. Since the upper radiator hose is the one delivering coolant to the radiator, as regulated by the thermostat, changes in block coolant temps. are fairly immediate. No grounding issues.Cons: Requires removal, drilling, and tapping. Stuck thermostat is still an issue, but less so due to the proximity of the sensor to the thermostat itself - basically you'll know when things are wrong before you warp the block.Since the goal is to do things the right way and monitor coolant temps with the most accuracy and highest rate of change one should mount the thermo-sensor in the thermostat housing. It's a good position as it lets you gauge the rate of change in coolant temps _exiting_ the block, but pre-radiator. If you are seeing a fast rise from 185 to 220F, you should know fairly quickly that there is a problem and to reduce the load on the engine or go full heater/fans and shut it down.---Now I know the concept of "drilling and tapping" is scary to some, but it's really not that hard at all. When it comes down to it you're basically just drilling a hole and threading it so you can screw something into it; in our case, the thermo-sensor.All of the tools required are available at any place selling halfway decent tools. I got mine at Sears as Home Depot and Lowe's have fairly bad selection when it comes to individual taps.You will need:1. 1/8-27 NPT pipe tap.2. 11/32" drill bit.3. Tap wrench.4. Some kind of cutting lubricant (or kerosene).5. Teflon tape.6. Liquid gasket (I used some Hondabond I had sitting around).All together it's about 15$. ■●■●■ My notes show it's 3/8" NPT I can't add a reply so I added this here
  9. Yo Bronn, I just know tgat the Durabak bed coating works well. What will you use it for?
  10. Yo B, Consider using a Kragen or Dorman or equivalent new t stat housing that has a temp sender port on the top of it. following by Seattle FSB:for a gauge, but equivalent; "Water temperature sensor: How to tap and install --------------------------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: This will be overly detailed so as to try to give people more data with less questions as opposed to the opposite. The job is not hard, regardless of the detail.Every aftermarket temperature gauge on the market requires a temperature sender to get it's readings. They work by using a variable resistor inside the sender that changes resistance based on water temperature. By sending voltage through the sender and comparing the returned voltage to the sent voltage can determine the actual water temp as the water temp varying the resistance results in a different output voltage. This is precisely how the gauge or control unit works to display the proper temperature (it has been calibrated to the response of the sensor already).There are multiple places to mount the temperature sender such as the throttle body coolant lines, upper radiator hose, engine block, or thermostat housing. The goal is to obtain a location where one can have accurate readings but more importantly readings which are capable of a high rate of change. Ideally the best place would be in the water pump housing or in a block coolant passage right after the thermostat. Unfortunately due to physical design issues of the thermosensor and clearances, the water pump and/or block are a bad idea.Almost all of the sensors out there are 1/8 NPT size threaded probes with the electrical harnesson the external portion.Pros/Cons of locations:1. Throttle Body coolant lines.Pros: Easy to do. You can use a freely available tee-line with a 1/8 NPT tap in the tee to install the sensor. Reasonably accurate block coolant temperatures regardless of the thermostat state.Cons: Slow rate of change. Less room for installation when the TB coolant lines are commonly bypassed. No advantage over the other locations except for ease of installation. Due to the flow of coolant through the block, this is really only showing you temperatures indicative of coolant passing through about half the block, post-radiator cooled. Grounding issues.2. Upper radiator hose.Pros: High rate of change when the thermostat is open. Harder to find a tee-line adapter for the size of the radiator hose compared to the throttle body.Cons: Somewhat useless when the thermostat is closed as the readings are more stagnant. This can be an issue when one has a stuck thermostat. In addition we are really interested in the sum of block AND post-radiator temperatures which this location isn't best for. Grounding issues.3. Thermostat housing.Pros: High rate of change when thermostat is open. Medium rate of change when thermostat is closed. Since the upper radiator hose is the one delivering coolant to the radiator, as regulated by the thermostat, changes in block coolant temps. are fairly immediate. No grounding issues.Cons: Requires removal, drilling, and tapping. Stuck thermostat is still an issue, but less so due to the proximity of the sensor to the thermostat itself - basically you'll know when things are wrong before you warp the block.Since the goal is to do things the right way and monitor coolant temps with the most accuracy and highest rate of change one should mount the thermo-sensor in the thermostat housing. It's a good position as it lets you gauge the rate of change in coolant temps _exiting_ the block, but pre-radiator. If you are seeing a fast rise from 185 to 220F, you should know fairly quickly that there is a problem and to reduce the load on the engine or go full heater/fans and shut it down.---Now I know the concept of "drilling and tapping" is scary to some, but it's really not that hard at all. When it comes down to it you're basically just drilling a hole and threading it so you can screw something into it; in our case, the thermo-sensor.All of the tools required are available at any place selling halfway decent tools. I got mine at Sears as Home Depot and Lowe's have fairly bad selection when it comes to individual taps.You will need:1. 1/8-27 NPT pipe tap.2. 11/32" drill bit.3. Tap wrench.4. Some kind of cutting lubricant (or kerosene).5. Teflon tape.6. Liquid gasket (I used some Hondabond I had sitting around).All together it's about 15$.
  11. Yo, If you have it ($), do it and enjoy it!
  12. Yo, Talk about luck!
  13. Yo, The copy paste worked out well.
  14. CONTINUOUS MEMORY DIAGNOSTIC TROUBLE CODE (DTC) 212: CHECK IDM CIRCUIT CONTINUITY Key off. Disconnect Powertrain Control Module (PCM). Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires, etc. Service as necessary. Install breakout box, leave PCM disconnected. Disconnect Ignition Control Module (ICM). Measure resistance between Test Pin 4 at the breakout box and IDM circuit at the ICM vehicle harness connector. Is resistance less than 5.0 ohms? Yes No GO to NA5. SERVICE open circuit. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT PCM. CLEAR Continuous Memory. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test. NA5 CHECK IDM CIRCUIT FOR SHORTS TO POWER (EXCLUDING VREF) Key off. Breakout box installed. PCM and ICM disconnected. Measure voltage between Test Pin 4 at the breakout box and battery negative post. Key on, engine off. Measure voltage between Test Pin 4 and Test Pins 40 and 60 at the breakout box. Is any voltage reading greater than 10.5 volts? Yes No SERVICE short circuit. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test. GO to NA6 . NA6 CHECK IDM CIRCUIT FOR SHORTS TO VREF AND PIP Key off. Breakout box installed, PCM disconnected. ICM disconnected. Ignition coil disconnected on Non-CCD vehicles (refer to Pinpoint Test Schematic ). Disconnect Scan Tool from Data Link Connector (if applicable). Note: For proper results of this test, the Scan Tool must be disconnected. Due to the circuitry of the Scan Tool and the vehicle, voltage can be fed to the VREF circuit giving a false indication of a short to power. For Shorts To VREF: Measure resistance between Test Pin 4 and Test Pin 26 at the breakout box. For Shorts To PIP circuit: Measure resistance between Test Pin 4 and Test Pin 56 at the breakout box. Is each resistance greater than 10,000 ohms? Yes No GO to NA7 . SERVICE short circuits. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components and SCAN Tool (if applicable). RERUN Quick Test. NA7 CHECK IDM CIRCUIT FOR SHORT TO GROUND Note: During this check when 4-wire HO2S is connected to the vehicle harness on DI vehicles, a short to SIG RTN (Pin 46) may be indicated in conjunction with an actual PWR GND short. Key off. Breakout box installed, PCM disconnected. ICM disconnected. Scan tool disconnected from Data Link connector. Ignition coil disconnected on Non-CCD vehicles (refer to Pinpoint Test Schematic ). Measure resistance between Test Pin 4 and Test Pins 20, 40, 46 and 60 at the breakout box. Is each resistance above 10,000 ohms? Yes No RECONNECT Scan Tool. GO to NA8 . REMOVE breakout box. SERVICE short to ground in IDM circuit. RECONNECT all components. CLEAR Continuous Memory. RERUN Quick Test. NA8 CHECK ICM Key off. Breakout box installed. Connect PCM to breakout box. Reconnect ignition coil and ICM. Connect DVOM between Test Pin 4 and Test Pin 16 at the breakout box. Start engine. Observe DVOM when voltage is allowed to stabilize. Lightly tap on ICM to simulate road shock. Wiggle ICM connector (for 3.8L AX4S, 3.8L RWD, 3.0L, 7.0L and 7.5L Trucks, wiggle ICM, GCM and CMP sensor connectors). A sudden change in voltage indicates a fault. Is a fault indicated? Yes No DISCONNECT and INSPECT connectors. If connector and terminals are good, REMOVE breakout box, RECONNECT all components and REFER to Section 8A , DI Diagnostics (2.0L Probe, Section 8B). GO to NA9 . NA9 CHECK EEC HARNESS DVOM still connected between Test Pin 4 and Test Pin 16 at the breakout box. Key on, engine running. While observing a voltage change as in NA8 , perform the following: Grasp vehicle harness closest to ICM connector (for 3.8L AX4S, 3.8L RWD, 3.0L, 7.0L and 7.5L trucks, wiggle ICM, GCM and CMP sensor connectors). Shake and bend a small section of the EEC harness while working toward the dash panel. Also wiggle, shake and bend the EEC harness from dash panel to PCM. Is a fault indicated? Yes No ISOLATE fault and SERVICE as necessary. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. CLEAR Continuous Memory. RERUN Quick Test. GO to NA10. NA10 CHECK PCM AND HARNESS CONNECTORS Key off. Disconnect Powertrain Control Module (PCM). Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires, etc. Are connectors and terminals OK? Yes No GO to NA11 . SERVICE as necessary. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. CLEAR Continuous Memory. (REFER to Quick Test Appendix, Section 5A .) RERUN Quick Test. NA11 CHECK PCM FOR SHORT TO POWER Key off. Breakout box installed. PCM connected to breakout box. For vehicles with Remote Mounted ICM and Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor: Disconnect ICM and CMP. 7.0L Truck: Also disconnect Governor Control Module (GCM). All others: Disconnect ICM. Measure voltage between Test Pin 4 and chassis ground. Key on, engine off. Measure voltage between Test Pin 4 and Test Pins 40 and 60 at the breakout box. Is any voltage reading greater than 10.5 volts? Yes No REPLACE PCM. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test. GO to NA12 . NA12 CHECK PCM FOR SHORT TO GROUND Key off. Breakout box installed. PCM connected to breakout box. Ignition coil (Non-CCD only), ICM and CMP sensor disconnected. Measure resistance between Test Pin 4 and Test Pins 40, 46 and 60 at breakout box. Is each resistance greater than 10,000 ohms? Yes No REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. For further diagnosis, REFER to Section 8A , DI Diagnostics (Probe, Section 8B). REPLACE PCM. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test.
  15. Yo RR, Dr Al-be-Sure Suggest a you take an aspirin and see me in the morning. Until then, I recommend going through this list by Doc Ford in his 1996 Workshop Manual on how I stopped worrying about my old Bronco and fixed it". See http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/manual/stj/stjleft.htm for more info. Vehicle overloaded or unevenly loaded. CORRECT as required.Improper (mismatched) tires and wheels. INSTALL correct tire and wheel combination. Improper tire pressure. ADJUST air pressure in tires.Loose steering gear mounting.ADJUST to 73-89 Nm (54-66 lb-ft).Front and rear suspension components loose, worn or exhibit damaged condition. TIGHTEN or REPLACE as necessary. "First step is to have someone turn the steering wheel back and forth (with the truck running) while you watch the steering shaft, pitman arm, drag link, tie rod, and tie rod ends. All of these parts should move with one another, so if you see one part moving before the next does, you've got an issue." by BigUgly88EBCheck all the tie rod ends for endplay. With the wheel-rocking trick, start at the pitman arm, there should be no motion between the arm and the drag link, or the drag link to the tie rod, or the tire rod to the steering arms. Replace and align as required..." Source: by Carl J Raise the vehicle and place safety stands under the I-beam axle beneath the spring.Have an assistant grasp the lower edge of the tire and move the wheel in and out.While the wheel is being moved, observe the lower spindle arm and the lower part of the axle jaw. A 0.794mm (1/32-inch) or greater movement between the lower portion of the I-beam and the lower spindle arm indicates that the front suspension lower arm ball joint must be replaced.To check the front suspension upper ball joints, grasp the upper edge of the tire and move the wheel in and out. A 0.794mm (1/32-inch) or greater movement between the upper spindle arm and the upper portion of the I-beam indicates that the front suspension upper ball joint must be replaced. By FordLoose, worn or damaged steering sector shaft arm drag link. TIGHTEN or REPLACE as necessary. Loose wheel lug nuts. TIGHTEN to specifications.Improperly adjusted front wheel bearing. ADJUST to specification.Steering column intermediate shaft coupling fractured. REPLACE as required.Incorrect toe setting. SET to specifications. .Improperly adjusted steering gear.Pre-load Adjustment, All Bronco & Ford, mid-70s to 00; "...1. Disconnect the pitman arm from the sector shaft using a Pitman Arm Puller (Tool T64P-3590-F). 2. Disconnect the fluid return line at the reservoir and cap the reservoir return line nipple to retain the fluid in the reservoir. 3. Place the end of the return line in a suitable container and turn the steering wheel from stop-to-stop several times to discharge the fluid from the gear. Discard the fluid. 4. Turn the steering wheel to the right stop, then back left 45 degrees. 5. Attach an inch-pound torque wrench to the steering wheel nut and determine the torque required to rotate the shaft slowly approximately one-eighth turn (45) toward center from the initial 45 degree position. Note this first value. 6. Turn the steering gear back to center and determine the torque required to rotate the shaft back and forth across the center position ( 90). Compare the center value to the first value, using the following criteria: * Vehicles with less than 5,000 miles (8046 Km): If total meshload over mechanical center is less than 15 in-lb (1.7 Nm) or greater than 24 in-lb (2.7 Nm), RESET to first value PLUS 11-15 in-lb (1.2-1.7 Nm). * Vehicles with more than 5,000 miles (8046 Km), or with new sector shaft: If meshload over mechanical center is NOT 7 in-lb (0.8 Nm) GREATER than the first value, RESET to 10-14 in-lb (1.13-1.6 Nm) GREATER than first value. . If reset is required, loosen the adjuster locknut and turn the sector shaft adjuster screw until the reading is the specified value greater than the torque at 45 degrees from the stop. Hold the sector shaft screw in place, and tighten the locknut. 8. Re-check torque readings and replace the pitman arm and steering wheel hub cover. 9. Connect the fluid return line to the reservoir and fill the reservoir to specification with the specified fluid. Check belt tension & adjust if necessary. Do not pry against the reservoir to obtain proper belt load. Pressure will deform the reservoir and cause it to leak...." Steering column misaligned.Steering column components loose or exhibit excessive play. REPAIR as required.Tips;Scrubbed tires indicate the wheels have incorrect toe. Parts to check are the idler arm, strut rod bushings, tie-rod ends, pitman arm and center link. Cupped tires are symptoms of incorrect camber. Parts that could be worn and ready to replace are the ball joint, coil springs and control-arm bushings. Cupped tires may also be a symptom of frame fatigue. Uneven tire wear suggests that the alignment is loose or parts are worn. Check for loose wheel bearings, loose ball joints and worn bushings. Make sure the wheels are balanced, and inspect the shock absorbers. Variable tire wear indicates the tires are improperly inflated. Overinflated tires have excessive wear in the center; underinflated tires have excessive outer wear. Make sure tires are inflated to the proper pressure. Regularly inspecting the three interrelated systems — braking, steering and suspension — and replacing worn parts help assure safe, trouble-free driving. ..." by MOOG® Have to go and see an 88 owner with a leaky rear... edit: I meant his 88 has a rear leak
  16. Yo Griff, Fir more towing info, see 96 Bronco Owner's Guide, Maintenance Schedules & Parts and Accessories by Ford @ https://www.fleet.ford.com/partsandservice/owner-manuals Note, 96 is same as most earlier years especially 92-95, except for:92 through 95 uses the Electronic Engine Control, version Four (EEC-IV, aka On Board Diagnostics (OBD-I)) engine management computer.96 uses the OBD-II (EEC-V) engine management computer;4WABS (93-96);RABS (87-92);Air Bag (94-96);3 Heated Exhaust Gas Oxygen Sensors in 96 Federal emissions and one more in 96 California Emissions3 Screw Automatic Locking Hubs (Built from May 95 through 96); Spark Plug Wire Routing & Firing Order (The firing order for 1987-1993 5.0Ls is 1-5-4-2-6-3-7-8. The firing order for 1994- 96 5.0Ls & all 5.8Ls is 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8.);R134a in 94-96;2-piece Spindle Rolling Diaphragm Seal (RDS) used on 5/95 to 96 Broncos & F Series 1/2-ton 4WD;Ford added Crankshaft Position Sensor, aka misfire detection sensor and the tone ring in 96. The misfire sensor is an electromagnetic inductance coil similar in operation to a camshaft or crankshaft position sensor. A four-point stator, or pulse ring, located behind the crankshaft damper generates an electrical impulse in the sensor at each 90 degrees of rotation. The powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650) monitors the sensor pulses and flags any misfire events. When a specified number of misfires occur within a certain time frame, the powertrain control module will alert the driver to the condition by turning on the CEL.Most 92-95 Speed Density (SD) EFI uses a Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAP), a Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) & an Air Intake Temperature Sender (ACT) that gives the engine certain volumetric efficiencies over it's RPM range. SD EFI also uses what is called bank fire injection. 4 injectors are fired at one time on each side of the engine (only 2 wires for firing injectors from EEC-IV).Mass Air Electronic Fuel Injection (MAF), aka Sequential Electronic Fuel Injection (SEFI) in all 94 5.0,most 95 5.8 are SD, 95 5.0 & 95 5.8 California models are MAF and all 96s are MAF. Need to verify other Bronco years/engines. Mass Air directly reads the mass of air (or number of molecules of air). By doing this, it can detect the changes in the volume of air, in addition to it's pressure & temperature. Mass air has one separate wire for each injector & fires them twice for every power stroke of the engine. This makes the injector timing more accurate & will help emissions along with power.96 5.8 do not have the Air Injection (AIR), Secondary Air Injection; Pump (Smog Pump), Thermactor Air Bypass (TAB) & Thermactor Air Diverter (TAD) Solenoids; Diverter, Check & Bypass Valves, Cross-Over Tube, etc. But 96 5.0 does have the system.Only 95 5.8L California models & all 96 have the Differential Pressure Feedback (DPFE) Sensor instead of EGR Valve Position (EVP) Sensor.The 96, Vapor Management Valve (VMV) replaces the canister purge valve (CanP valve) used in EEC IV. But the 96 manual still shows CanP valve probably because it was a late addition to the 96 production line.The Speed Control Deactivation Switch (SCDS) in a 93 Bronco is located on the driver side frame rail, but in 94 through 96 it is on the master cylinder.Still researching other differences
  17. Yo, You most likely have the C6 transmission. What is the current issue with your Bronco?
  18. Yo Skitter, Keyed? Our 96, bought new was keyed on driver side too onky 3 months after we purchased it. Some have no proper upbringing.
  19. Yo Skitter, Too bad about the Power... I use Motorcraft brake parts since we purchased our 96 New. No issues except for me defunct dealer's decision to let their Dodge dealership install the rotors h7bs incorrevtly. The Motorcraft parts are actually supplied by MAT Holdings, parent to ther manufacturing entity, GRI Engineering for brake pads, shoes, shims, back plates, discs, calipers. MAT Auto also "...supplies ride control products including shocks, struts, and suspension systems for the North American commercial vehicle market..." "...MAT Auto Group maintains multiple technical centers of excellence around the globe to support product development with OEM customers such as General Motors, Ford, Mercedes Benz, BMW, Audi, Jaguar, Land Rover, Volkswagen, Nissan, TRW, Continental Teves, Bosch, WABCO, and Knorr-Bremse among others. In addition MAT Auto Group supplies high performance OEM products to auto racing companies AP Racing, Brembo, Hi Spec Motorsport, and Maxx Autosport..." Read THE TRUTH ABOUT DEALERSHIP VS. AFTERMARKET PARTS By Andy J @ https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/r/advice/cars-101/the-truth-about-dealership-vs-aftermarket-parts I know that Ford and other auto manufacturers require different and more stringent specs than say, a national chain such as the zone.
  20. Yo BB, The F series boards are said to be longer . I never heard of shortening them, but believe it can be done. Broncograveyard does sell 1980-1997 Ford Bronco & Ford Truck Running Board Support Bars @ 1980-1997 Ford Bronco & Ford Truck Running Board Support Bars https://shop.broncograveyard.com/1980-1997-Ford-Bronco-Ford-Truck-Running-Board-Support-Bars/productinfo/35510/ The bars tend to rust.Have you tried Craigslist? There's almost always people parting them out on there. For YARD SEARCH on-line, I use; https://www.hollanderparts.com A yard that uses Hollander Interchange can search other yards and have it shipped. "...For over eighty years, Hollander has been making the best tool for fast, interchangeable part matches. The new Edition Hollander Interchange contains more interchangeable options than ever before. The Hollander Interchange provides auto recyclers and auto collectors, rebuilders, and others with the easiest and most comprehensive solution for identifying interchangeable auto parts..." See their yard Directory @: https://www.hollanderparts.com/SellerDirectory Can select certain parts Has Vehicle Pics for some vehicles If a specific part, such as the tailgate torsion bar isn't listed, search again for the next higher assembly, such as in this instance, the tailgate. ¤ or http://www.car-parts.com/ Can select certain parts Can search by year range, such as 92 through 96 & has best item condition descriptions such as "COVER BAD LEATHER PWR BKT GRY" Has Vehicle Pics for some vehicles incl. interior/dash, back seat, front & rear and engine bay ¤ http://www.picknpull.com This is a Company name w/yard locations in various states Can NOT Select certain parts Has Vehicle Pics for some vehicles ¤ http://row52.com/Search Can NOT Select certain parts Has Vehicle Pics for some vehicles AND Want a Part? It's Easy... 1. You create a Parts Wanted Listing. 2. Parts Pullers respond with offers. 3. You pick the best one. A Parts Puller gets the parts you need. ¤ For obsolete parts by Ford long version pn: http://www.partsvoice.com/ http://www.rearcounter.com http://www.greensalescompany.com https://nospartsltd.com & For new discounted Ford parts: https://consumerlink.oeconnection.com/91554453363118850 (suggested by JScatt!) ¤ Stop by a local Ford dealer parts department and ask. They will look it up in the Interchange Guide data base. The Ford bean counters deleted the public Interchange Guide and Buyer's Guide a few years ago to save their $ & make it more difficult for us to maintain our Broncos. As an example, here is Ford Motorcraft's buyers guide info for a ""Motorcraft basic pn": "12A646 is a relay.EEC power, mostly found under the hood next to the fuel pump relay on EFI vehicles. . RELAY, ELECTRONIC ENGINE CONTROL (ASSEMB DY-865 [Universal Relay] 2 Bbl.; E1VB-12A646AA,E3AF-12A646B1A,E3UF-12A6461A1,A2A, B1A,,B2A,E3TF-12A646A1A,A2A,B1A,B2A and from the Buyers Guide: Part No.: DY-865 Manufacturer: MOTORCRAFT Part Type: ELEC ENG CONT ASSY RELAY Total No. of Vehicles: 275 FORD (202) 1983-1994 AEROSTAR (9) 1986-1992 1992 V6-183ci 3.0L F/I Vin U 1991 V6-183ci 3.0L F/I Vin U 1990 V6-183ci 3.0L F/I Vin U 1989 V6-183ci 3.0L F/I Vin U 1988 V6-183ci 3.0L F/I Vin U 1987 L4-140ci 2.3L F/I Vin A 1987 V6-183ci 3.0L F/I Vin U 1986 L4-140ci 2.3L F/I Vin A 1986 V6-183ci 3.0L F/I Vin U BRONCO (18) 1983-1991 1991 V8-302ci 5.0L F/I Vin N 1991 V8-351ci 5.8L F/I Vin H 1990 V8-302ci 5.0L F/I Vin N 1990 V8-351ci 5.8L F/I Vin H 1989 V8-302ci 5.0L F/I Vin N 1989 V8-351ci 5.8L F/I Vin H 1988 V8-302ci 5.0L F/I Vin N 1988 V8-351ci 5.8L F/I Vin H 1987 V8-302ci 5.0L F/I Vin N 1987 V8-351ci 5.8L 4 BBL Vin H 1986 V8-302ci 5.0L F/I Vin N 1986 V8-351ci 5.8L 4 BBL Vin H 1985 V8-302ci 5.0L F/I Vin N 1984 V8-302ci 5.0L 2 BBL Vin F 1984 V8-351ci 5.8L 2 BBL Vin G 1984 V8-351ci 5.8L 4 BBL Vin H 1983 V8-302ci 5.0L 2 BBL Vin F 1983 V8-351ci 5.8L 2 BBL Vin G ETC." ¤ Pull-A-Part SEARCH INTERCHANGEABLE PARTS INVENTORY, @ https://www.pullapart.com/inventory/...-parts/search/ Handy_andy_cv64 01:08 PM 11-01-2014 Times three on the truck info. That always helps. El Kabong 02:07 PM 11-01-2014 $350 seems awful high. If you are patient you should find one for less. Around here they seem to run about $50-$100 when they show up on CL. Did your Bronco originally have an external spare? Part of the reason for the bumper spare carriers is that there is internal bracing for the carrier that isn't there on trucks that didn't originally have the external carrier. The bumper versions also carry more weight without body damage. Mine was an internal carrier originally. Here are the details about the addition of the external carrier: Quote: Originally Posted by El Kabong 22- My Bronco doesn't have an exterior tire carrier. Can I add one? Yes, but... Broncos that came with a stock external tire carrier have additional supports behind the sheet metal that trucks with internal carriers don't have. If you don't add interior support, the carrier will rip the sheet metal. Some have had trouble with large spares damaging the tailgate even with the stock supports. The strongest solution seems to be a rear bumper with a tire carrier built on it. Several of us have added the stock type spare carrier, with various results. If you add a stock external carrier, you'll need to add support inside both the tailgate & the fender. I added an external carrier to my 90. It has been ok so far. I carry a 33" BFG m/t on an aluminum rim, so it is not as heavy as some spares. I wheel it, but I'm not crazy with it. No jumping. I can see some flex in the quarter panel when the spare is all the way open. I am always careful when it's opened. It seems solid & tight when it's closed. It is somewhat misaligned in that the rubber block at the bottom hits before the latch. I think it keeps it tighter & may prevent damage. I also kept the interior spare carrier. It's pretty much out of the way with no spare it, gives me something to lash to, & makes it easy to carry 2 spares on the trail (Some guy named Tom told me early on I should always have 2 spares ). For the tailgate, you probably want to use the stock support for inside the tailgate. It's just way too easy to install the stock brace to even consider making one. It has to tie into the structure inside of the tailgate to distribute the load. It can be unbolted from one truck & bolted into the next. If you add a carrier to a Bronco that never had one, use that support. Here's a pic of the tailgate support (Pic borrowed from Dustball, the last I heard he's still selling this part). The top is at the left. You can see the 3 holes for the latch. The other holes mount to the structure inside of the tailgate. Quote: Originally Posted by Dustball There is also a support inside the fender, but it can't be removed from a good truck without a lot of work/damage. It's better to get that part from a truck that's being parted out, or to make a new one. If you use the stock fender support, you may have to cut it to fit it into place. My internal fender supports are made from 3/16 plate, bent to fit. They are each bent twice with 2 flats that contact the fender at the bolt holes, & a center portion that doesn't contact around the curve. The edges are ground round, to try to keep from them punching through. They don't connect to each other or to the existing internal bracing like the stock brace does, but it would be stronger if they did. I may still modify them to do so. It's easier to make the supports to fit the shape & hole pattern of the carrier hinge brackets. The hinges are the same shape as the fender, & it's much simpler to work with the hinges on the bench than trying to bend the steel to match the truck. Here is a sideways view of the stock support inside the rear fender from Mickaila's Bronco build. Quote: Originally Posted by mickaila Here is an overall view, again, ITS UP SIDE DOWN, as you can see the top portion of the panel (where the soft top sits) on the ground presently: And a shot through the taillight opening of one of my homebuilt braces (It's getting rusty in there, it should have been painted. Even inside of the quarter panel in California ). You can see how it isn't formed to the fender at the curve, but takes a straight line across. Be aware that the design of the latch changed (I think the break is between 89 & 90, but I'm not sure). The older ones have a long release lever & sort of a hook strike, while the newer ones have a short release handle & a latch mechanism similar to the doors. Make sure that the strike you buy matches your carrier. My experience is with a 90. I have heard that the hinge brackets are a different shape to match the rear fenders of 78-79s, 80-86s, & 87-96s, so be sure to use the matching hinge brackets for your fenders. I have also heard that the carriers themselves will swap between 78-79s, 80-86s & 87-96s if you use the correct hinge brackets, but don't know that personally. They also went from 2 holes mounting the latch to 3 at some point. The 2 & 3 hole parts may work with each other, but you might have to drill a 3rd hole & add a nut behind. My internal tailgate brace had only 2 holes. They matched 2 of the strike holes, & I drilled the 3rd. Here's an earlier strike (89 & before?): Somewhere there's a pic of the later strike (90 & later?) When I find it I'll add it. III%er 12:02 AM 11-04-2014 I am just missing the carrier and I have to drill and tap or easy out one hole. When I repair my tailgate I will see what I can do to beef up the support on the tailgate. It looks like the damage on the top of the gate is from having spare tire plus years of rain getting in there. I keep looking for the carrier and hopefully I find one, but I don't need it till after Christmas, because that's when I am doing the body work. dlogeston 03:49 PM 11-06-2014 I like jeffs bronco grave yard. But I find a lot of good stuff on ebay. GetBent4x4 07:29 AM 11-09-2014 row52.com by Taboola Sponsored Links You May Like 2019 Audis Worth Considering, and WhyKelley Blue Book 20 Historical Photos They Dare Not Show You In SchoolSoGoodly Common Signs of Psoriatic ArthritisPsoriatic Arthritis | Search Ads Michigan Brothers Unearth 220 Year Old TreasureOmgCheckItOut Beautiful Cross Breed Dogs That Will Leave You Wondering Why People Still Buy Dogs From BreedersLivestly 20 gardening hacks that will make your neighbours jealousTip Tricks The Wild Secrets Buyers Learned About Their Homes After the Deal Had ClosedRealtor.com 5 Luxury Cars So Amazing You Won't Believe They Cost Under $50kStuff Answered Reply Up Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 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  21. Yo 93, If your 4WABS system is not working, You can tap into the 4WABS Control Module Connector Jumper 14 (CKT 530, LG/Y)to 21 (CKT 519 (LG/BK) Jumper & 39 (CKT 491 (O/LB)to 22 (CKT 523, R/PK)..." Source: by Turbo Ghost Or if 4WABS Is Working, open the harness to Connector and splice into those four wires about 4 inches from Connector.
  22. Yo fyre, I believe leak may be from a freeze plug. 3 freeze plugs behind the exhaust manifold on both sides.
  23. Yo RR, YW! Url Tag Img Thumb DoorGsktFiller.JPG | Hits: 1773 | Size: 75.14 KB | Posted on: 12/19/12 | Link to this image To rejuvinate collapsed door gaskets, insert foam caulk backer rod. Larger foam will fit, but this is sufficient, and fairly easy to install. I was able to push about 5 feet directly in, and then use needle-nose pliers through the vent holes to pull the rest through. A long wire fed through beforehand would have made pulling the rod in even easier. Any leftovers can be used in the doors: Immediately after this, the doors should be fully aligned to prevent further damage to the seals. http://www.fourdoorbronco.com/board/showthread.php?6884-Door-Alignment Finally, apply silicone spray lube &/or teflon dry lube to the gaskets to keep them soft, clean, and silent doorfrontfill.jpg | Hits: 1546 | Posted on: 1/29/13 | View original size (392.18 KB) This scrap of caulk-saver rod from the door gasket filler will prevent small pebbles & parts from jamming in the narrow gap, causing dents or rust. The bottom is open to allow water to drain rearward. It can also be used above the rear wheel arch reinforcements, and inside the door seals
  24. Yo R-R, Stuff happens! Been there, done stuff too!😎 Problem with the "new look" here, our signatures don't show our Bronco or F Series years, nor engine, etc, so; I figure you need this; Two ECTs, one for the TEMPERATURE GAUGE and other for the EEC IV (ECT). ECT = engine cooling temp sensor which threads into the "octagonal" tree shaped tube that's threaded into the lower intake manifold and has a small TB cooling tube and hose AND another metal tube/hose threaded into the side which goes to the heater core inlet IIRC.This "octagonal" tree shaped tube is available at Rock Auto for: 1993 FORD BRONCO 5.87 V8 : for exampleHeat & Air Conditioning : Heater Hose / Pipe Suggest buying Motorcraft, all day, every day!MOTORCRAFT KT81 Click for more information about this part {#E8TZ18B402C} HVAC Heater PipeTube to manifold$46.79 btw, this is a priced drop of $2.00 since June 2016!!! Same for 93 5.0. BTW, Ford advises to apply pipe sealant or Teflon® tape to the threads of the new temperature gauge sender.
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