Jump to content
66-96 Ford Broncos - Early & Full Size

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Today
  2. Last week
  3. Yo B, 3/8" NPT do you have a pic of the emission vacuum tree location?
  4. Yo B, Consider using a Kragen or Dorman or equivalent new t stat housing that has a temp 9sender port on the top of it. following by Seattle FSB:for a gauge, but equivalent; "Water temperature sensor: How to tap and install --------------------------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: This will be overly detailed so as to try to give people more data with less questions as opposed to the opposite. The job is not hard, regardless of the detail.Every aftermarket temperature gauge on the market requires a temperature sender to get it's readings. They work by using a variable resistor inside the sender that changes resistance based on water temperature. By sending voltage through the sender and comparing the returned voltage to the sent voltage can determine the actual water temp as the water temp varying the resistance results in a different output voltage. This is precisely how the gauge or control unit works to display the proper temperature (it has been calibrated to the response of the sensor already).There are multiple places to mount the temperature sender such as the throttle body coolant lines, upper radiator hose, engine block, or thermostat housing. The goal is to obtain a location where one can have accurate readings but more importantly readings which are capable of a high rate of change. Ideally the best place would be in the water pump housing or in a block coolant passage right after the thermostat. Unfortunately due to physical design issues of the thermosensor and clearances, the water pump and/or block are a bad idea.Almost all of the sensors out there are 1/8 NPT size threaded probes with the electrical harnesson the external portion.Pros/Cons of locations:1. Throttle Body coolant lines.Pros: Easy to do. You can use a freely available tee-line with a 1/8 NPT tap in the tee to install the sensor. Reasonably accurate block coolant temperatures regardless of the thermostat state.Cons: Slow rate of change. Less room for installation when the TB coolant lines are commonly bypassed. No advantage over the other locations except for ease of installation. Due to the flow of coolant through the block, this is really only showing you temperatures indicative of coolant passing through about half the block, post-radiator cooled. Grounding issues.2. Upper radiator hose.Pros: High rate of change when the thermostat is open. Harder to find a tee-line adapter for the size of the radiator hose compared to the throttle body.Cons: Somewhat useless when the thermostat is closed as the readings are more stagnant. This can be an issue when one has a stuck thermostat. In addition we are really interested in the sum of block AND post-radiator temperatures which this location isn't best for. Grounding issues.3. Thermostat housing.Pros: High rate of change when thermostat is open. Medium rate of change when thermostat is closed. Since the upper radiator hose is the one delivering coolant to the radiator, as regulated by the thermostat, changes in block coolant temps. are fairly immediate. No grounding issues.Cons: Requires removal, drilling, and tapping. Stuck thermostat is still an issue, but less so due to the proximity of the sensor to the thermostat itself - basically you'll know when things are wrong before you warp the block.Since the goal is to do things the right way and monitor coolant temps with the most accuracy and highest rate of change one should mount the thermo-sensor in the thermostat housing. It's a good position as it lets you gauge the rate of change in coolant temps _exiting_ the block, but pre-radiator. If you are seeing a fast rise from 185 to 220F, you should know fairly quickly that there is a problem and to reduce the load on the engine or go full heater/fans and shut it down.---Now I know the concept of "drilling and tapping" is scary to some, but it's really not that hard at all. When it comes down to it you're basically just drilling a hole and threading it so you can screw something into it; in our case, the thermo-sensor.All of the tools required are available at any place selling halfway decent tools. I got mine at Sears as Home Depot and Lowe's have fairly bad selection when it comes to individual taps.You will need:1. 1/8-27 NPT pipe tap.2. 11/32" drill bit.3. Tap wrench.4. Some kind of cutting lubricant (or kerosene).5. Teflon tape.6. Liquid gasket (I used some Hondabond I had sitting around).All together it's about 15$. ■●■●■ My notes show it's 3/8" NPT I can't add a reply so I added this here
  5. The T-stat housing already has a threaded port there; I just need the thread size of the port
  6. Yo Bronn, I just know tgat the Durabak bed coating works well. What will you use it for?
  7. Yo B, Consider using a Kragen or Dorman or equivalent new t stat housing that has a temp sender port on the top of it. following by Seattle FSB:for a gauge, but equivalent; "Water temperature sensor: How to tap and install --------------------------------------------------------------------------Disclaimer: This will be overly detailed so as to try to give people more data with less questions as opposed to the opposite. The job is not hard, regardless of the detail.Every aftermarket temperature gauge on the market requires a temperature sender to get it's readings. They work by using a variable resistor inside the sender that changes resistance based on water temperature. By sending voltage through the sender and comparing the returned voltage to the sent voltage can determine the actual water temp as the water temp varying the resistance results in a different output voltage. This is precisely how the gauge or control unit works to display the proper temperature (it has been calibrated to the response of the sensor already).There are multiple places to mount the temperature sender such as the throttle body coolant lines, upper radiator hose, engine block, or thermostat housing. The goal is to obtain a location where one can have accurate readings but more importantly readings which are capable of a high rate of change. Ideally the best place would be in the water pump housing or in a block coolant passage right after the thermostat. Unfortunately due to physical design issues of the thermosensor and clearances, the water pump and/or block are a bad idea.Almost all of the sensors out there are 1/8 NPT size threaded probes with the electrical harnesson the external portion.Pros/Cons of locations:1. Throttle Body coolant lines.Pros: Easy to do. You can use a freely available tee-line with a 1/8 NPT tap in the tee to install the sensor. Reasonably accurate block coolant temperatures regardless of the thermostat state.Cons: Slow rate of change. Less room for installation when the TB coolant lines are commonly bypassed. No advantage over the other locations except for ease of installation. Due to the flow of coolant through the block, this is really only showing you temperatures indicative of coolant passing through about half the block, post-radiator cooled. Grounding issues.2. Upper radiator hose.Pros: High rate of change when the thermostat is open. Harder to find a tee-line adapter for the size of the radiator hose compared to the throttle body.Cons: Somewhat useless when the thermostat is closed as the readings are more stagnant. This can be an issue when one has a stuck thermostat. In addition we are really interested in the sum of block AND post-radiator temperatures which this location isn't best for. Grounding issues.3. Thermostat housing.Pros: High rate of change when thermostat is open. Medium rate of change when thermostat is closed. Since the upper radiator hose is the one delivering coolant to the radiator, as regulated by the thermostat, changes in block coolant temps. are fairly immediate. No grounding issues.Cons: Requires removal, drilling, and tapping. Stuck thermostat is still an issue, but less so due to the proximity of the sensor to the thermostat itself - basically you'll know when things are wrong before you warp the block.Since the goal is to do things the right way and monitor coolant temps with the most accuracy and highest rate of change one should mount the thermo-sensor in the thermostat housing. It's a good position as it lets you gauge the rate of change in coolant temps _exiting_ the block, but pre-radiator. If you are seeing a fast rise from 185 to 220F, you should know fairly quickly that there is a problem and to reduce the load on the engine or go full heater/fans and shut it down.---Now I know the concept of "drilling and tapping" is scary to some, but it's really not that hard at all. When it comes down to it you're basically just drilling a hole and threading it so you can screw something into it; in our case, the thermo-sensor.All of the tools required are available at any place selling halfway decent tools. I got mine at Sears as Home Depot and Lowe's have fairly bad selection when it comes to individual taps.You will need:1. 1/8-27 NPT pipe tap.2. 11/32" drill bit.3. Tap wrench.4. Some kind of cutting lubricant (or kerosene).5. Teflon tape.6. Liquid gasket (I used some Hondabond I had sitting around).All together it's about 15$.
  8. Greetings, In need of some wisdom. What is the thread size for the threaded port on the top side of the thermostat housing (previously occupied by the emission vacuum tree)?? Previously did the electric fan conversion using a Hayden fan controller, now the fan doesn't come on when expected and the radiator is in need of replacement. With the radiator being replaced, I am planning to use a different fan controller with a temp sending unit placed in the thermostat housing; research suggests this is the best location. Currently, I have a sending unit that is situated between the fins of the radiator. Any help is greatly appreciated. B-Co Kid
  9. hello somebody knows the durabak, fluid film and fertan usa? thanks
  10. Earlier
  11. Yo, If you have it ($), do it and enjoy it!
  12. If you don't know about the Web company called Custom Offsets you probably should. Most these "kids" know more about wheels and tires then the guys working at your local tire shop. Junior is one of the staff members at this web company and is building up his Bronco. I've been following the Youtube videos for a while now and these guys make some fun stuff.
  13. Big time! But then again, it was my daily driver from 2000-2014, when many of those years gas was averaging $4 a gallon in California. Wouldn't you know when I bought a second car, the prices went down by $1.50 a gallon?!@#$%...
  14. Yo, Talk about luck!
  15. Hey, I appreciate the feedback on your towing experience. It helps. The Bronco has gotten me where I've needed to go over the years and more. I won't give up my '92 until it gives up on me! Quick story, the fuel pump went out once on my way home from work. It was going on midnight and there wasn't any traffic. I was at the top of Topanga Cyn. and coasted downhill for two miles right into my driveway! At the time I thought I blew out the engine because there was smoke coming from under the hood. What a relief that it was the pump!
  16. Yo, The copy paste worked out well.
  17. Thats formatted nicely.
  18. CONTINUOUS MEMORY DIAGNOSTIC TROUBLE CODE (DTC) 212: CHECK IDM CIRCUIT CONTINUITY Key off. Disconnect Powertrain Control Module (PCM). Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires, etc. Service as necessary. Install breakout box, leave PCM disconnected. Disconnect Ignition Control Module (ICM). Measure resistance between Test Pin 4 at the breakout box and IDM circuit at the ICM vehicle harness connector. Is resistance less than 5.0 ohms? Yes No GO to NA5. SERVICE open circuit. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT PCM. CLEAR Continuous Memory. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test. NA5 CHECK IDM CIRCUIT FOR SHORTS TO POWER (EXCLUDING VREF) Key off. Breakout box installed. PCM and ICM disconnected. Measure voltage between Test Pin 4 at the breakout box and battery negative post. Key on, engine off. Measure voltage between Test Pin 4 and Test Pins 40 and 60 at the breakout box. Is any voltage reading greater than 10.5 volts? Yes No SERVICE short circuit. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test. GO to NA6 . NA6 CHECK IDM CIRCUIT FOR SHORTS TO VREF AND PIP Key off. Breakout box installed, PCM disconnected. ICM disconnected. Ignition coil disconnected on Non-CCD vehicles (refer to Pinpoint Test Schematic ). Disconnect Scan Tool from Data Link Connector (if applicable). Note: For proper results of this test, the Scan Tool must be disconnected. Due to the circuitry of the Scan Tool and the vehicle, voltage can be fed to the VREF circuit giving a false indication of a short to power. For Shorts To VREF: Measure resistance between Test Pin 4 and Test Pin 26 at the breakout box. For Shorts To PIP circuit: Measure resistance between Test Pin 4 and Test Pin 56 at the breakout box. Is each resistance greater than 10,000 ohms? Yes No GO to NA7 . SERVICE short circuits. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components and SCAN Tool (if applicable). RERUN Quick Test. NA7 CHECK IDM CIRCUIT FOR SHORT TO GROUND Note: During this check when 4-wire HO2S is connected to the vehicle harness on DI vehicles, a short to SIG RTN (Pin 46) may be indicated in conjunction with an actual PWR GND short. Key off. Breakout box installed, PCM disconnected. ICM disconnected. Scan tool disconnected from Data Link connector. Ignition coil disconnected on Non-CCD vehicles (refer to Pinpoint Test Schematic ). Measure resistance between Test Pin 4 and Test Pins 20, 40, 46 and 60 at the breakout box. Is each resistance above 10,000 ohms? Yes No RECONNECT Scan Tool. GO to NA8 . REMOVE breakout box. SERVICE short to ground in IDM circuit. RECONNECT all components. CLEAR Continuous Memory. RERUN Quick Test. NA8 CHECK ICM Key off. Breakout box installed. Connect PCM to breakout box. Reconnect ignition coil and ICM. Connect DVOM between Test Pin 4 and Test Pin 16 at the breakout box. Start engine. Observe DVOM when voltage is allowed to stabilize. Lightly tap on ICM to simulate road shock. Wiggle ICM connector (for 3.8L AX4S, 3.8L RWD, 3.0L, 7.0L and 7.5L Trucks, wiggle ICM, GCM and CMP sensor connectors). A sudden change in voltage indicates a fault. Is a fault indicated? Yes No DISCONNECT and INSPECT connectors. If connector and terminals are good, REMOVE breakout box, RECONNECT all components and REFER to Section 8A , DI Diagnostics (2.0L Probe, Section 8B). GO to NA9 . NA9 CHECK EEC HARNESS DVOM still connected between Test Pin 4 and Test Pin 16 at the breakout box. Key on, engine running. While observing a voltage change as in NA8 , perform the following: Grasp vehicle harness closest to ICM connector (for 3.8L AX4S, 3.8L RWD, 3.0L, 7.0L and 7.5L trucks, wiggle ICM, GCM and CMP sensor connectors). Shake and bend a small section of the EEC harness while working toward the dash panel. Also wiggle, shake and bend the EEC harness from dash panel to PCM. Is a fault indicated? Yes No ISOLATE fault and SERVICE as necessary. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. CLEAR Continuous Memory. RERUN Quick Test. GO to NA10. NA10 CHECK PCM AND HARNESS CONNECTORS Key off. Disconnect Powertrain Control Module (PCM). Inspect for damaged or pushed out pins, corrosion, loose wires, etc. Are connectors and terminals OK? Yes No GO to NA11 . SERVICE as necessary. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. CLEAR Continuous Memory. (REFER to Quick Test Appendix, Section 5A .) RERUN Quick Test. NA11 CHECK PCM FOR SHORT TO POWER Key off. Breakout box installed. PCM connected to breakout box. For vehicles with Remote Mounted ICM and Camshaft Position (CMP) sensor: Disconnect ICM and CMP. 7.0L Truck: Also disconnect Governor Control Module (GCM). All others: Disconnect ICM. Measure voltage between Test Pin 4 and chassis ground. Key on, engine off. Measure voltage between Test Pin 4 and Test Pins 40 and 60 at the breakout box. Is any voltage reading greater than 10.5 volts? Yes No REPLACE PCM. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test. GO to NA12 . NA12 CHECK PCM FOR SHORT TO GROUND Key off. Breakout box installed. PCM connected to breakout box. Ignition coil (Non-CCD only), ICM and CMP sensor disconnected. Measure resistance between Test Pin 4 and Test Pins 40, 46 and 60 at breakout box. Is each resistance greater than 10,000 ohms? Yes No REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. For further diagnosis, REFER to Section 8A , DI Diagnostics (Probe, Section 8B). REPLACE PCM. REMOVE breakout box. RECONNECT all components. RERUN Quick Test.
  19. Yo RR, Dr Al-be-Sure Suggest a you take an aspirin and see me in the morning. Until then, I recommend going through this list by Doc Ford in his 1996 Workshop Manual on how I stopped worrying about my old Bronco and fixed it". See http://www.diesel-dave.com/vehic/manual/stj/stjleft.htm for more info. Vehicle overloaded or unevenly loaded. CORRECT as required.Improper (mismatched) tires and wheels. INSTALL correct tire and wheel combination. Improper tire pressure. ADJUST air pressure in tires.Loose steering gear mounting.ADJUST to 73-89 Nm (54-66 lb-ft).Front and rear suspension components loose, worn or exhibit damaged condition. TIGHTEN or REPLACE as necessary. "First step is to have someone turn the steering wheel back and forth (with the truck running) while you watch the steering shaft, pitman arm, drag link, tie rod, and tie rod ends. All of these parts should move with one another, so if you see one part moving before the next does, you've got an issue." by BigUgly88EBCheck all the tie rod ends for endplay. With the wheel-rocking trick, start at the pitman arm, there should be no motion between the arm and the drag link, or the drag link to the tie rod, or the tire rod to the steering arms. Replace and align as required..." Source: by Carl J Raise the vehicle and place safety stands under the I-beam axle beneath the spring.Have an assistant grasp the lower edge of the tire and move the wheel in and out.While the wheel is being moved, observe the lower spindle arm and the lower part of the axle jaw. A 0.794mm (1/32-inch) or greater movement between the lower portion of the I-beam and the lower spindle arm indicates that the front suspension lower arm ball joint must be replaced.To check the front suspension upper ball joints, grasp the upper edge of the tire and move the wheel in and out. A 0.794mm (1/32-inch) or greater movement between the upper spindle arm and the upper portion of the I-beam indicates that the front suspension upper ball joint must be replaced. By FordLoose, worn or damaged steering sector shaft arm drag link. TIGHTEN or REPLACE as necessary. Loose wheel lug nuts. TIGHTEN to specifications.Improperly adjusted front wheel bearing. ADJUST to specification.Steering column intermediate shaft coupling fractured. REPLACE as required.Incorrect toe setting. SET to specifications. .Improperly adjusted steering gear.Pre-load Adjustment, All Bronco & Ford, mid-70s to 00; "...1. Disconnect the pitman arm from the sector shaft using a Pitman Arm Puller (Tool T64P-3590-F). 2. Disconnect the fluid return line at the reservoir and cap the reservoir return line nipple to retain the fluid in the reservoir. 3. Place the end of the return line in a suitable container and turn the steering wheel from stop-to-stop several times to discharge the fluid from the gear. Discard the fluid. 4. Turn the steering wheel to the right stop, then back left 45 degrees. 5. Attach an inch-pound torque wrench to the steering wheel nut and determine the torque required to rotate the shaft slowly approximately one-eighth turn (45) toward center from the initial 45 degree position. Note this first value. 6. Turn the steering gear back to center and determine the torque required to rotate the shaft back and forth across the center position ( 90). Compare the center value to the first value, using the following criteria: * Vehicles with less than 5,000 miles (8046 Km): If total meshload over mechanical center is less than 15 in-lb (1.7 Nm) or greater than 24 in-lb (2.7 Nm), RESET to first value PLUS 11-15 in-lb (1.2-1.7 Nm). * Vehicles with more than 5,000 miles (8046 Km), or with new sector shaft: If meshload over mechanical center is NOT 7 in-lb (0.8 Nm) GREATER than the first value, RESET to 10-14 in-lb (1.13-1.6 Nm) GREATER than first value. . If reset is required, loosen the adjuster locknut and turn the sector shaft adjuster screw until the reading is the specified value greater than the torque at 45 degrees from the stop. Hold the sector shaft screw in place, and tighten the locknut. 8. Re-check torque readings and replace the pitman arm and steering wheel hub cover. 9. Connect the fluid return line to the reservoir and fill the reservoir to specification with the specified fluid. Check belt tension & adjust if necessary. Do not pry against the reservoir to obtain proper belt load. Pressure will deform the reservoir and cause it to leak...." Steering column misaligned.Steering column components loose or exhibit excessive play. REPAIR as required.Tips;Scrubbed tires indicate the wheels have incorrect toe. Parts to check are the idler arm, strut rod bushings, tie-rod ends, pitman arm and center link. Cupped tires are symptoms of incorrect camber. Parts that could be worn and ready to replace are the ball joint, coil springs and control-arm bushings. Cupped tires may also be a symptom of frame fatigue. Uneven tire wear suggests that the alignment is loose or parts are worn. Check for loose wheel bearings, loose ball joints and worn bushings. Make sure the wheels are balanced, and inspect the shock absorbers. Variable tire wear indicates the tires are improperly inflated. Overinflated tires have excessive wear in the center; underinflated tires have excessive outer wear. Make sure tires are inflated to the proper pressure. Regularly inspecting the three interrelated systems — braking, steering and suspension — and replacing worn parts help assure safe, trouble-free driving. ..." by MOOG® Have to go and see an 88 owner with a leaky rear... edit: I meant his 88 has a rear leak
  20. I'm telling you! After getting back in it after almost 2 years., I no longer like the seat recline (fixable with a new seat), even with a steering stabilizer, the 33s are all over the road and I feel like a Nascar driver constantly working the steering wheel. Also the total removal of rear carpet and sound deadening material after installing poly-sway bar bushings and no music makes for a interesting sounding scenario
  21. The only hope for fuel economy is to rebuild the engine and change your gear ratio. Even then a '17 truck will still beat it. And the issue isn't springs and shocks. The question is does anybody make a OBS F-sreies quick ratio steering box? And how the freak does one get rid of the mushy brake pedal?
  22. Were no help! I've Asked Amy and Jeeves to no avail! Even Web MD had no answers, is there anyway to get my 1993 Bronco to handle, ride and get the same fuel economy as my 2017 F150? Asking for a friend.
  23. For what it’s worth, I have a ‘93 XLT with a 5.8L and the towing package. Back in 2005 I had a 2” lift, 33s, and Bilstein shocks. I put a Class IV hitch on it and towed a completely packed and very heavy 6x12 tandem axle U-Haul trailer from Jackson, Mississippi, to Tucson, Arizona. The chassis, engine, and transmission had no problems at all. The Bronco can handle more than you would expect, and I think if you are willing to take your time and not try to keep up with traffic, you should not hesitate to use it. In 2008 I used it to tow the same type trailer with just as much weight from Tucson to Brenham, Texas (about 1,000 miles). It did better than the moving truck we rented, which nearly got killed by bad diesel fuel. Over the past few years I’ve used it to tow a buddy’s 2006 Air Nautique 226, which is a huge boat. The Bronco is not happy about it, but it can do it. And now I have a 4” lift and 34s and 4:10 dif gears. As for the air springs, they would be nice, but not necessary, as long as your shocks are decent. As for towing in overdrive, it is not recommended, but I have done it a lot and my E4OD has held up just fine. It depends a lot on the conditions and terrain. I will admit that I am a bit of a risk taker. I hope this helps, God bless your move, and don’t apologize for towing massive stuff with your Bronc. Derek
  24. Yo Griff, Fir more towing info, see 96 Bronco Owner's Guide, Maintenance Schedules & Parts and Accessories by Ford @ https://www.fleet.ford.com/partsandservice/owner-manuals Note, 96 is same as most earlier years especially 92-95, except for:92 through 95 uses the Electronic Engine Control, version Four (EEC-IV, aka On Board Diagnostics (OBD-I)) engine management computer.96 uses the OBD-II (EEC-V) engine management computer;4WABS (93-96);RABS (87-92);Air Bag (94-96);3 Heated Exhaust Gas Oxygen Sensors in 96 Federal emissions and one more in 96 California Emissions3 Screw Automatic Locking Hubs (Built from May 95 through 96); Spark Plug Wire Routing & Firing Order (The firing order for 1987-1993 5.0Ls is 1-5-4-2-6-3-7-8. The firing order for 1994- 96 5.0Ls & all 5.8Ls is 1-3-7-2-6-5-4-8.);R134a in 94-96;2-piece Spindle Rolling Diaphragm Seal (RDS) used on 5/95 to 96 Broncos & F Series 1/2-ton 4WD;Ford added Crankshaft Position Sensor, aka misfire detection sensor and the tone ring in 96. The misfire sensor is an electromagnetic inductance coil similar in operation to a camshaft or crankshaft position sensor. A four-point stator, or pulse ring, located behind the crankshaft damper generates an electrical impulse in the sensor at each 90 degrees of rotation. The powertrain control module (PCM) (12A650) monitors the sensor pulses and flags any misfire events. When a specified number of misfires occur within a certain time frame, the powertrain control module will alert the driver to the condition by turning on the CEL.Most 92-95 Speed Density (SD) EFI uses a Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor (MAP), a Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) & an Air Intake Temperature Sender (ACT) that gives the engine certain volumetric efficiencies over it's RPM range. SD EFI also uses what is called bank fire injection. 4 injectors are fired at one time on each side of the engine (only 2 wires for firing injectors from EEC-IV).Mass Air Electronic Fuel Injection (MAF), aka Sequential Electronic Fuel Injection (SEFI) in all 94 5.0,most 95 5.8 are SD, 95 5.0 & 95 5.8 California models are MAF and all 96s are MAF. Need to verify other Bronco years/engines. Mass Air directly reads the mass of air (or number of molecules of air). By doing this, it can detect the changes in the volume of air, in addition to it's pressure & temperature. Mass air has one separate wire for each injector & fires them twice for every power stroke of the engine. This makes the injector timing more accurate & will help emissions along with power.96 5.8 do not have the Air Injection (AIR), Secondary Air Injection; Pump (Smog Pump), Thermactor Air Bypass (TAB) & Thermactor Air Diverter (TAD) Solenoids; Diverter, Check & Bypass Valves, Cross-Over Tube, etc. But 96 5.0 does have the system.Only 95 5.8L California models & all 96 have the Differential Pressure Feedback (DPFE) Sensor instead of EGR Valve Position (EVP) Sensor.The 96, Vapor Management Valve (VMV) replaces the canister purge valve (CanP valve) used in EEC IV. But the 96 manual still shows CanP valve probably because it was a late addition to the 96 production line.The Speed Control Deactivation Switch (SCDS) in a 93 Bronco is located on the driver side frame rail, but in 94 through 96 it is on the master cylinder.Still researching other differences
  25. Thanks for the advice. I think a small trailer with even weight distribution would be the thing. And I'll get those shocks as well. The long distance (Calif. to Virginia) could have some challenges, but if I do it conservatively, it might work.
  26. The Axle width of the 5.8 is the same as the 5.0. Don't know who was saying those were different. MAX trailer weight with the 351w is rated for 7100 with 10 to 15% of that being on the ball. If I was you, I would take the time to install air shocks in the rear to help stabilize the Bronco under load. The E4OD is a strong transmission and will work great but you have to turn over drive off. Towing with the 351 isn't bad.
  1. Load more activity


×
×
  • Create New...