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NEED HELP Transmission Fluid and Engine oil LEAK


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#1 EddieBauer351

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 04:00 PM

My 96 bronco is leaking BOTH Transmission fluid and Engine Oil. I don't know what to do with it, at first it was just the transmission leaking, so I figured I would put a new seal on, but now it's leaking oil too, and I don't even know how to begin to approach this problem.
Thanks,
Dylan
1996 Ford Bronco Eddie Bauer Edition 351 5.8ltr.

#2 Rons beast

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 08:07 PM

I feel your pain!
Do you know where the oil is leaking from?
What seal did you replace?
96 Eddie Bauer,"the Beast"
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#3 EddieBauer351

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 08:43 PM

I feel your pain!
Do you know where the oil is leaking from?
What seal did you replace?


It's leaking from the front of the oil pan, and I didn't replace a seal yet, I was going to, until it started leaking oil too.
1996 Ford Bronco Eddie Bauer Edition 351 5.8ltr.

#4 Seabronc

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Posted 14 June 2011 - 10:49 AM

Sounds like two completely different problems. Oil pan leak could be just needing new gaskets. Transmission leak if from the tail piece, well, it sounds like you were on the track there.

Good luck,

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#5 EddieBauer351

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Posted 14 June 2011 - 08:04 PM

Sounds like two completely different problems. Oil pan leak could be just needing new gaskets. Transmission leak if from the tail piece, well, it sounds like you were on the track there.

Good luck,

Posted Image


Much appreciated, thanks for the help
1996 Ford Bronco Eddie Bauer Edition 351 5.8ltr.

#6 miesk5

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 05:37 AM

yo,
I ASSume it is the E4OD?

If so,
Leakage Inspection in a 96 from 1996 Bronco with E4OD Automatic Transmission Workshop Manual
Source: by Ford via miesk5
E4ODExternalSealing.gif
Item Part Number Description
1 7902 Converter Assembly
2 87650-S2 Converter Drain Plug
3 7L323 Front Pump Support Seal
4 7A248 Front Pump Seal Assembly
5 7D441 Front Pump Square Cut O.D. Seal
6 N805260-S Bolt and Washer Assembly
7 7G379 Washer
8 7A136 Pump Gasket
9 7A020 Fluid Level Indicator
10 7A228 Fluid Filler Tube Assembly
11 391308-S Filler Tube O-Ring
12 7N463 Short Fluid Inlet Tube Assembly
13 7005 Case
14 7034 Vent Assembly
15 7D273 Fluid Tube Inlet Connector
16 7D174 Converter Drain Back Check Valve Assembly — Rear
17 7086 Extension Housing Gasket
18 7A039 Extension Housing (4x2)
19 7052 Extension Housing Seal
20 7A039 Extension Housing (4x4)
21 7H183 Extension Housing Plug
22 7B498 Manual Control Lever Oil Seal
23 7G391 Solenoid Valve Body Assembly
24 7A191 Transmission Pan Gasket
25 7A194 Transmission Pan (4x2)



CAUTION: Cork gaskets and elastomeric gaskets are not interchangeable. If you remove a cork gasket, replace it with a cork gasket. If you remove an elastomeric gasket, clean, inspect and reuse unless gasket is damaged. Be careful not to cut or bend elastomeric gasket.

NOTE: A unique transmission pan and pan retaining bolts are required to use the new elastomeric gasket for past model service. The cork style gasket will be retained for past model service where a new transmission pan is not required. If the transmission pan is damaged and requires replacement, a kit will be available. This kit will contain a transmission pan, elastomeric gasket and 20 pan bolts having an increased thread length to accommodate current and past model usage.



If transmission is equipped with a cork gasket, discard it and install a new gasket. If transmission is equipped with the new elastomeric reusable gasket, clean, inspect and reuse unless damaged.

Leakage at the transmission pan to case gasket often can be stopped by tightening the attaching bolts to 14-16 Nm (10-12 lb-ft). Service the pan gasket as required.

leakage is found by the solenoid body connector, refer to Main Control Valve Body in the In-Vehicle Service portion of this section. Replace O-ring on the connector snout of the solenoid body assembly.

Check the transmission fluid filler tube connection at the transmission case. If leakage is found here, install a new short fluid inlet tube.

CAUTION: Do not try to stop the fluid leak by increasing the torque beyond specification. This may cause damage to the case threads.

Check the transmission fluid lines and fittings between the transmission and the fluid inlet short tube in the radiator tank for looseness, wear, or damage. If leakage cannot be stopped by tightening a fluid line tube nut, replace the damaged parts. When fluid is found to be leaking between the case and the cooler line fitting, tighten the fitting to maximum specification. Refer to Fluid Cooler Lines in the In-Vehicle Service portion of this section. If the leak continues, replace the cooler line fitting and tighten to specification. The same procedure should be followed for fluid leaks between the radiator cooler and cooler line fittings.

Check the engine coolant in the radiator (8005). If transmission fluid is present in the coolant, the transmission fluid cooler (7A095) in the radiator is probably leaking.

The transmission fluid cooler can be further checked for leaks by disconnecting the lines from the cooler fittings and applying no more than 345 kPa (50 psi) air pressure to the fittings. Remove the radiator cap (8100) to relieve the pressure buildup at the exterior of the fluid cooler tank. If the transmission fluid cooler is leaking and/or will not hold pressure, replace the transmission fluid cooler.

If leakage is found at the manual control lever shaft (7C493), replace the seal.

When a converter drain plug leaks, remove the drain plug. Install new drain plug. Tighten to 24-27 Nm (18-20 lb-ft).

Check for fluid leaking from the end of extension housing (7A039). Leakage may result from damaged seal, missing garter spring or worn extension bushing or damaged speedometer plug. Replace seal assembly and/or bushing as necessary.

Inspect the plugs for leakage. Ensure they are tightened to 8-16 Nm (6-12 lb-ft). If tightening does not stop the leak, replace the plug.

Using the old fluid cooler tube as a guide, bend the new fluid cooler tube as required. Add the necessary fittings and install the fluid cooler tube.

After the fittings have been tightened, add fluid as needed and check for fluid leaks.


Fluid Leakage in Torque Converter Area
In diagnosing and correcting fluid leaks in the torque converter (7902) area, use the following procedures to locate the exact cause of the leakage. Leakage at the front of the transmission as evidenced by fluid around the converter housing, may have several sources. By careful observation it is possible, in many instances, to pinpoint the source of the leak before removing the transmission from the vehicle. The paths that the fluid can take to reach the bottom of the converter housing are as shown in the following illustration. The following five steps correspond with the numbers in the illustration.

Fluid leaking by the torque converter impeller hub seal lip will tend to move along the converter impeller hub and onto the back of the impeller housing. Except in the case of a total seal failure, fluid leakage by the lip of the seal will be deposited on the inside of the converter housing only, near the outside diameter of the converter housing.

Fluid leakage by the outside diameter of the converter hub seal and the case will follow the same path which the leaks by the inside diameter of the seal follow.

Fluid leakage from the torque converter to the flywheel stud weld, drain plug, or seal weld will appear at the outer diameter of the torque converter on the back face of the flywheel (6375), and in the converter housing only near theflywheel. If a converter leak is suspected, remove torque converter and pressure check. Refer to Torque Converter Checks under Disassembly/Reassembly of Subassemblies in the Disassembly portion of this section.

Fluid leakage from the pump will flow down the back of the converter housing. Leakage may be from loose or missing pump bolts, torn or damaged pump-to-case gasket and/or a worn pump bushing.

Engine oil leaks are sometimes improperly diagnosed as transmission pump seal leaks. The following areas of possible leakage should also be checked to determine if engine oil leakage is causing the problem.

Leakage at the valve cover may allow engine oil to flow over the converter housing or seep down between the converter housing and block causing oil to be present in or at the bottom of the converter housing.
Oil plug leaks will allow oil to flow down the rear face of the block to the converter housing.
Leakage at the crankshaft seal will work back to the flywheel, and then into the converter housing.

Leak Check Test
The following procedures should be used to determine the cause of the leakage before service is made.

Remove the fluid level indicator (7A020) and note the color of the fluid. Original factory fill fluid is dyed red to aid in determining if leakage is from the engine or transmission. Unless a considerable amount of makeup fluid has been added or the fluid has been changed, the red color should assist in pinpointing the leak.

Remove the converter housing cover. Clean off any fluid from the top and bottom of the converter housing, front of the transmission case, and rear face of the engine and pan. Clean the converter area by washing with suitable nonflammable solvent, and blow dry with compressed air.

Wash out converter housing and the front of the flywheel. The converter housing may be washed out using clean solvent and a squirt-type oil can. Blow all washed areas dry with compressed air.

Start and run the engine until the transmission reaches its normal operating temperature. Observe the back of the block and top of the converter housing for evidence of fluid leakage. Raise the vehicle on a hoist and position suitable safety stands under vehicle. Run the engine at fast idle, then at engine idle, occasionally shifting to the drive and reverse ranges to increase pressure within the transmission. Observe the front of the flywheel, back of the block (in as far as possible), and inside the converter housing and front of the transmission case. Run the engine until fluid leakage is evident and the probable source of leakage can be determined.

When a converter drain plug leaks, remove drain plug. Install new drain plug. Tighten to 24-27 Nm (18-20 lb-ft).


Leak Check Test with Black Light
Oil soluble aniline or fluorescent dyes premixed at the rate of 2.5ml (1/2 teaspoon) of dye powder to 0.24L (0.5 pint) of automatic transmission fluid have proven helpful in locating the source of fluid leakage. Such dyes may be used to determine whether an engine fluid or transmission fluid leak is present, or if the fluid in the transmission fluid cooler hose leaks into the engine coolant system. An ultraviolet light must be used to detect the fluorescent dye solution.

all from 1996 Bronco with E4OD Automatic Transmission Workshop Manual

Item Part Number Description
1 7902 Converter Assembly
2 87650-S2 Converter Drain Plug
3 7L323 Front Pump Support Seal
4 7A248 Front Pump Seal Assembly
5 7D441 Front Pump Square Cut O.D. Seal
6 N805260-S Bolt and Washer Assembly
7 7G379 Washer
8 7A136 Pump Gasket
9 7A020 Fluid Level Indicator
10 7A228 Fluid Filler Tube Assembly
11 391308-S Filler Tube O-Ring
12 7N463 Short Fluid Inlet Tube Assembly
13 7005 Case
14 7034 Vent Assembly
15 7D273 Fluid Tube Inlet Connector
16 7D174 Converter Drain Back Check Valve Assembly — Rear
17 7086 Extension Housing Gasket
18 7A039 Extension Housing (4x2)
19 7052 Extension Housing Seal
20 7A039 Extension Housing (4x4)
21 7H183 Extension Housing Plug
22 7B498 Manual Control Lever Oil Seal
23 7G391 Solenoid Valve Body Assembly
24 7A191 Transmission Pan Gasket
25 7A194 Transmission Pan (4x2)


more E4OD LINKs in my site @ http://www.broncolin...ex.php?index=63
such as;
Seal, Front Pump Replacement; "...My transmission is leaking fluid out the front, One of three conditions has likely happened. 1. The transmission too much fluid and was venting through the front pump 2. The transmission overheated and was venting fluid through the front pump 3. The front pump seal is bad. Replacing the front pump seal is not involved once the transmission is out. Simply remove the old seal and install the new one. Purchase the seal from Ford..."
Source: by Ian L (stangmata, stangmata50l, Bronco)
================


96E4ODSealsRingsGaskets.gif
Item Part Number Description
1 7L323 Front Pump Support Seal
2 7A248 Front Pump Square Cut OD Seal
3 7A548 Coast Clutch Inner Seal
4 7A136 Pump Gasket
5 7F225 Overdrive Clutch Piston Inner Seal
6 7F224 Intermediate Clutch Piston Outer Seal
7 7A548 Direct Clutch Outer Seal
8 7A548 Direct Clutch Inner Seal
9 7A548 Forward Clutch Piston Outer Seal
10 7D403 Reverse Clutch Piston Outer Seal
11 7086 Extension Housing Gasket
12 7D404 Reverse Clutch Piston Inner Seal
13 7A191 Transmission Pan Gasket
14 7C155 Case to Separator Plate Gasket
15 7D100 Separator Plate to Control Body Gasket
16 7A548 Forward Clutch Piston Inner Seal
17 7B498 Manual Control Lever Oil Seal
18 7D025 Forward Clutch Cylinder Seal (2 Req'd)
19 7D429 Forward Clutch Cast Iron Seal (2 Req'd)
20 7F225 Intermediate Clutch Piston Inner Seal
21 7A548 Overdrive Clutch Piston Outer Seal
22 7A548 Coast Clutch Outer Seal
23 7G402 Coast Clutch Ring Seal, Teflon
24 7A248 Front Pump Seal Assembly

Attached Files


Edited by miesk5, 15 June 2011 - 05:43 AM.

in my archived BRONCO TECHNICAL

site; http://web.archive.o...s.com/index.php?;
select a LINK, Right Click and and Hit Properties;

copy the second HTTP address

paste in a new browser to see the original page

96 Bronco, E4OD, Man Xfer Case & Hubs
Thanks to All Who Serve


#7 miesk5

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 05:57 AM

yo,
Part II - Oil Pan
Are you sure it is leaking from the pan gasket (btw, pan can be rusted out as mine is and causing a leak... Mine isn't leaking, yet, but I have been removomg rust where I can get to and using Rust Bullet.); and not the rear main seal or valve cover gaskets, etc.?


Availability of New Silicone Gasket & Sealant TSB 98-7-4 for 84-96 Bronco; 84-98 Econoline, F-150, F-250 HD, F-250 LD; 84-99 Super Duty F Series, etc. Source: by Ford via performanceprobe.com
ISSUE A new Silicone Gasket And Sealant (F7AZ-19554-EA) material is now available for routine engine service or repair of engine oil leaks.
ACTION Use the new Silicone Gasket And Sealant for servicing:

Oil pan gaskets and T-joints
Intake end seals
Overhead cam caps
Valve and timing covers
Bearing split lines
Side cover plates
Rear oil seals
The new sealant has better adhesion, flexibility for moving/vibrating joints, resistance to fluids, and is easier to dispense.
NOTE: THIS MATERIAL IS NOT A DIRECT REPLACEMENT FOR A SILICONE RUBBER, GRAPHITE, OR OTHER TYPE OF PRE-FORMED GASKET.

F7AZ-19554-EA Silicone Gasket And Sealant
=============

Gasket Installation info in a 96 5.8; "...I just did mine last night. Did not have to raise the motor at all. It does help to remove the starter and drop the exhaust at the manifolds. It drops down a ways so the pan will drop a little more. The pan drops down far enough to get the old gasket out. Get the engine as clean as you can with a can or two of engine degreaser before you start. Especially at the tranny inspection plate. The new gasket can be put on by going around the outise of the pan. Others have said to try to get it under the oil pump. There is enough slack in the front and back where it goes around the bearings to spread out far enough to get it in place. It took a while to clean off the surfaces of the pan and block for a clen fit. It took about 5 hours overall..."
Source: by Tony R (TonyR)

Or consider renting a hoist and raising the engine.. be careful of balancer,,, intake manifold, etc.

Finally, one more comment by me on this (for today...lol). When I was Navy & @ shore... I often met w/many suppliers esp. the major US steel mills. One rep. (John.. a great man!) described the differences between companies that manufacture commercial and industrial products ranging from refigerators to trucks.
When selling appliance/vehicle body panel, etc. rolled steel to the customer, the mills would discount 10% automatically because the edges and outside coil of the steel roll would be rusty or slightly damaged due to storage/shipment.
The "higher quality firms" would basically scrap these sections; while the "others" would try to remove or minimize the rusty sections and use it in various "non-appearance" parts of the vehicle or item they were manufacturing.

This was in the 80's and 90's; and as we know, since then, Ford and other manufacturers have improved the body panel specs and quality exc. for this and some other items (tailgates and some suspension components).

in my archived BRONCO TECHNICAL

site; http://web.archive.o...s.com/index.php?;
select a LINK, Right Click and and Hit Properties;

copy the second HTTP address

paste in a new browser to see the original page

96 Bronco, E4OD, Man Xfer Case & Hubs
Thanks to All Who Serve


#8 EddieBauer351

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Posted 15 June 2011 - 11:19 AM

[quote name='miesk5' timestamp='1308145059' post='114515']

Thanks alot, but I figured out why it was leaking. My transfer case was snapped, IN HALF. I never even looked at the transfer case, I was just looking where the fluid was coming from. but I guess too many miles and offroading doesn't mix well cause that's what made the transfer case snap.
1996 Ford Bronco Eddie Bauer Edition 351 5.8ltr.



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